Previously Approved Courses AY 2020-2021

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Spring 2021


Cognitive Psychology

EDLF 5260:  Cognitive Psychology and Education

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  This course will include both cognitive psychology and education perspectives, focusing on what cognitive psychology can tell us about how people learn and how to apply that knowledge in education. We will focus on the ways that cognitive psychology research can be designed and evaluated to be most informative in addressing practical questions of education and learning, including research questions, populations, methods, etc.

Instructor:  Jirout

EDLF 5270 Adult Development and Aging

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment restrictions: None

This course will focus on key issues in adult psychological and physical development. We will explore development from a biopsychosocial perspective, examining topics such as health, cognitive function, personality, interpersonal relationships, and work. This will be a theory-to-practice class, with an emphasis on current theories of optimal or successful aging. In particular, we will focus on how adults respond and adapt to changes in their health, their environment, and their sense of self. Contexts for development will include education, health care, the family, and the community, with attention to individual differences (gender, race, ethnicity). 

Instructor: Whaley

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  Smyth (Section 1) Morris (Section 2)

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2005 or 3005 with grade of C or higher. May not be taken concurrently with 2005
Description of course contents: A continuation of discussion of research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours.  Instructor:  Schmidt

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions: None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 3490 Infant Development
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 1010
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents Infancy is the time of life during which enormous changes take place- newborns are very different from the inquisitive, walking and talking 2-year-old. The following lines of development during the first two years are traced in detail: motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Environmental influences, including parental behavior are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on caregivers.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Fulfills Second Writing Requirement in CAS)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science major/minor

Description of course contents:  Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.

 Instructor:  Loncke

 

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions 

*Note:  PSYC 4290 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3

Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable.  We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony.  Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

PSYC 4500-Section 2: The Neurodegenerative Experience
*Note:  PSYC 4500-Section 2 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course will explore the physiological and psychological components of neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on changes in adult cognition and delving into how a patient might experience the disease process.

Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 4500- Section 6 Cognitive Aging

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course aims to discuss the state-of-the-art in the large field of cognitive aging and the main life span predictors that lead to healthy aging.

Instructor: Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4500-Section 7: Psychology of Emotion
*Note:  PSYC 4500-Section 7 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:None

Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course will survey contemporary research and theory in affective science. We will examine the origins, functions, and behavioral and social consequences of emotions, paying particular attention to cross-cultural and cross-species evidence.

Instructor: Wood

PSYC 5323 R in Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course is designed to introduce the statistical language R, with the purpose of preparing students to use and apply quantitative methods in their future psychology research.  Topics may include handling data structures, cleaning data, visualizing and presenting data, and reviewing introductory statistics using R.

Instructor: Meyer

PSYC 5332 Quantified Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5332 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: The class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on the problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have the potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 5720: Fundamentals of Item Response Theory
Credits:  3
Prerequisite: Undergraduates must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005 and 3006 OR 4005 and 4006     
Enrollment Restrictions:  Instructor Permission only. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course 

Prerequisite:  4th year Psychology major or minor or 4th year in Cognitive Science or Graduate student. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course

Description of course contents:  This course is designed to introduce you to the concepts of item response theory (IRT) models and their application to substantive psychological problems in measurement, such as test and scale design and analysis.

Prerequisite: Undergraduates must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005 and 3006 OR 4005 and 4006

Instructor:  Schmidt

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Neuroscience

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NESC 4245 Neuroscience Through the Nobels
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions: Cannot enroll if previously taken BIOL/PSYC/NESC 3559 topic: Neuroscience Through the Nobels
Description of course contents: Will study Nobel prize winning discoveries that shaped our understanding of the nervous system; explore the original experimental basis for these discoveries; and learn about the Nobel laureates. This course will enable students to acquire a deeper understanding of fundamental principles in Neuroscience, to familiarize with various research techniques, and to develop a sense of history of Neuroscience research.
Instructor: Cang

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment Restrictions:  Not allowed if BIOL 3050 has been taken or are currently enrolled

Description of course contents:  After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.

Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 3500-001:  Hidden Figures: Brain Science through Diversity

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course will introduce students to basic concepts in neurobiology/neuroscience/brain science discoveries while emphasizing research by women and URMs in science.

Instructor: Ribic

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions 

*Note:  PSYC 4290 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3

Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable.  We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony.  Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

PSYC 4500-Section 2: The Neurodegenerative Experience
*Note:  PSYC 4500-Section 2 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course will explore the physiological and psychological components of neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on changes in adult cognition and delving into how a patient might experience the disease process.

Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 4500-Section 7: Psychology of Emotion
*Note:  PSYC 4500-Section 7 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None

Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course will survey contemporary research and theory in affective science. We will examine the origins, functions, and behavioral and social consequences of emotions, paying particular attention to cross-cultural and cross-species evidence.

Instructor: Wood

PSYC 5265:  Functional Neuroanatomy

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3170
Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th year Psychology/Cognitive Science/Neuroscience and GSAS majors. Cannot be enrolled in another Psyc 4000+ course.
Description of course contents:  An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain.
Instructors:  Williams/Erisir

PSYC 5332 Quantified Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5332 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: The class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on the problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have the potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 5500-1 Applications of Brain Mapping With MRI

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2200 (or BIOL 3050) or PSYC 2160 required. PSYC 4200 or PSYC 5265 recommended. Some background in coding using Matlab, R or Python is recommended.

Enrollment Requirements:  Restricted to 3rd or 4th year PSYC majors or COG SCI majors or Neurosci majors.  Other majors with Instructor's Permission.

Enrollment Restrictions: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.
Instructor: Van Horn

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2100 (2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (2020)
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor: Kawasaki

BIOL 4280:  Genetic Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and 3010 required
Description of course contents:  This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction?   Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills.

Instructor: Hirsh

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  This two-lectures-per-week course explores the basic principles of sensory neurobiology. The course consists of four modules.  Each module represents one of the senses and consists of an introductory lecture, one or several lectures that will delve into the details of that sense, a current topic lecture on some recent finding, and finally, a guest lecture from a UVa researcher.
Instructor:  Provencio

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Linguistics

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ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

Instructor: Sicoli

ANTH 2430: Languages of the World

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language.

Instructor: Mirzayan

ANTH 3541-001 Topics in Linguistics: Language Change

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: Along the span of history and across the globe, the one constant of human language is change. This course introduces the study and analysis of language change over time in a variety of domains and contexts. Students will learn how to identify and decode processes and results of historical language change and apply these skills to analyze data bearing on relationships and contacts between different languages and their speakers. This course fulfills the Historical requirement for Linguistics majors and counts as a Linguistics Upper Level requirement for Cognitive Science majors.

Instructor: Staff

ANTH 3559-001 New Course in Linguistics: Creoles & Creolization

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: Linguistics as a field has historically had difficulty accounting for local vernaculars known as creoles. In this course, we consider several proposals for analyzing these languages and explaining their unique origins and characteristics. We broach important theoretical debates concerning creoles as a linguistic type, the creole continuum, and the concept of de-creolization. Finally, we attempt to answer the perennial question: What is a creole? The answer is at least as much anthropological as it is linguistic. Examples will be drawn primarily from Franco-Creolophone Louisiana. Familiarity with French, though not required, will be useful. This course counts as a Linguistics Upper Level requirement for Cognitive Science majors.

Instructor: Staff

EDHS 4030: Speech and Hearing Science

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work. 

Instructor: Loncke/Bull

FREN 3030: Phonetics

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard FREN French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

Instructor: Saunders

LING 4559-001 New Course in Linguistics: Linguistic Typology

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: In Linguistic Typology we explore structures in languages by analyzing both differences and similarities in language systems across the world. This entails exploration of the methods and results of previous typological research, analysis of linguistic data in terms of these typological findings, and critical evaluation of some of the theoretical assumptions inherent to the methods and interpretation of linguistic typological data. This course fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors and counts as a Linguistics Upper Level requirement for Cognitive Science majors.

Instructor: Mirzayan

LNGS 5000 Linguistic Principles in Language Pedagogy

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: Provides prospective language teachers with background in descriptive and theoretical linguistics, thus helping them to make informed pedagogical decisions, set realistic pedagogical goals, and read scholarship in pedagogy of the type that appears in relevant scholarly journals (e.g. The Modern Language Journal). Considers trends in Second Language Acquisition and the relevance thereto of Applied Linguistics in recent years. majors.

Instructor: Elson

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Fulfills Second Writing Requirement in CAS)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science major/minor

Description of course contents:  Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.

 Instructor:  Loncke

RUSS 3040 Applied Russian Phonetics  

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  RUSS 1020

Description of course contents: Examines the sound system of the Russian language with special attention to palatalization, vowel reduction, sounds in combination, and the relationship of sound to spelling. 

Instructor:  Elson

SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Velazquez Mendoza

SPAN 4530 Special Topics: Second Language Acquisition (Velazquez Mendoza)

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement; instructor permission.

Description of course contents: How do people learn a second language (L2)? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition? How do we define “competence”? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics.

Instructor:  Velazquez Mendoza

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Philosophy

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PHIL 1510: Introductory Seminar—The Ethics of Computing (Section 1 or 2)
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: Developments in computing technology have had a tremendous impact on our lives.  Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited.  In this course we will examine some of these changes and carefully consider their social and ethical implications, from the political and global to the personal and emotional.  We’ll end by thinking about computing changes that lie ahead – including the distant future.

Instructor:  Fung

PHIL 2330: Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: Do computers think? Can a persuasive case be made for the claim that the human mind is essentially a sophisticated computing device? These and related questions will be examined through readings in computer science, the philosophy of mind, logic, and linguistics.  For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/philosophy/.

Instructor: Humphreys

PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity. Discussion Required.
Instructor:  Cameron

PHIL 2500-001: Survey: Slurs, Bad Words, and Unruly Language
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: Will be updated 

Instructor:  Fox

PHIL 2500-200: Survey: Consciousness
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the place of consciousness in nature. Part 1 surveys theories of consciousness in cognitive science. Part 2 turns to the “hard problem” of consciousness: is it compatible with a scientific worldview? Part 3 examines types of experience that most theorists neglect––dreaming, mind-wandering, and dreamless sleep––that contain lessons about the methods of consciousness research and the conscious sense of self.

Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 2640: Rational Choice and Happiness
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: In this class, we will examine philosophical puzzles about our ability to make rational choices that affect or determine our own happiness. How can we rationally decide to undergo a significant experience – such as having a child or moving to a new country – when we have no way of knowing what that experience will be like? How can we rationally choose to make decisions about our future?

Instructor:  Barnes

PHIL 3500-001: Seminar Philosophy of Memory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: We will explore the nature and philosophical import of memory. Part 1: What is Memory examines experiential and causal theories of memory and asks whether memory extends past our bodies and is distinct from imagination. Part 2: Memory and Knowledge asks whether we should dogmatically accept our memories as true, even if they are reconstructive. Part 3: Memory and Personhood asks whether memory is required to remain the same person over time. Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3500-002: Seminar Animals and Ethics
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: An introduction to systems of non-classical logic, including both extensions and revisions to classical logic.  We will look at logical systems that extend classical logic to deal with the phenomena of possibility and time.  We will look at logics that revise classical logic to allow for sentences which are neither true nor false, or sentences which can be both.  We will show how these departures from classical logic can shed light on various philosophical questions.

Instructor: Greenway

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Computer Science

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Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  

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Electives

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KINE 3660: Neuroscience of Exercise

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course will address the underlying neuroanatomy associated with cognitive function in healthy individuals as well as those with neurocognitive/psychiatric pathologies and diseases. Throughout the semester, students will become consumers of cross- disciplinary research addressing the influence of physical activity and cognitive function.

Instructor: Resch

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for January 2021


Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2559 An Introduction to Cognition and Cognitive Biases
Credits:  3

Faculty: Hudson Golino, Mariana Teles Santos Golino

During the COVID-19 pandemic you might have experienced the phenomenon of the random and imperceptible thoughts that quickly popped up in your mind, sometimes leaving a trail of emotional and behavioral consequences. How the mind works is a question that have been contemplated for centuries but only in the past 60 years has been scientifically studied by cognitive psychologists. Knowing how our mental process are structured and how they function is a key to achieve higher levels of awareness and control over our mind and behavior. However, as we can see during the pandemic, we don’t operate rationally in the world all the time. There are a number of situations where we are actually behaving without the use or supervision of conscious logical processes. Throughout this course, we’ll be learning about the structure and functioning of mental processes, as well as when and why we have difficulty making decisions and thinking under uncertainty. The goal is to use our knowledge of cognitive psychology and decision making under uncertainty to learn about how humans think, and when we fail to think clearly. We believe that knowing how mental processes and cognitive biases work can help us understand our current global situation.

PSYC 3559 Section 200: How to Build A Healthy Human Brain (Can be taken for Psychology or Neuroscience Area but not both) Be sure and enroll in Section 200
Credits:  3 

Faculty: Jessica Connelly and James Morris

*Note:  How to Build A Healthy Human Brain may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

The social, mental, and physical well-being of humans is dependent upon slow maturation of a number of critical biological systems over the course of the lifespan. Biological and environmental influences on the maturation of these systems are vast and varied. Though unique, contributions of developmental environment and biological predisposition are often considered as independent predictors but modern science has demonstrated time and again that the two are richly intertwined. This Signature J-Term survey course examines how early life experience shapes the function of our genome, impacts the development of brain systems involved in the complexities of human life, and sets the stage for our abilities to forge new social bonds that promote healthy lives and rewarding personal experiences. Through lectures from thought experts across several fields of science, we will discuss how modern society has introduced many challenges to these developmental experiences including social, environmental and educational inequality, which are a direct threat to these natural human processes. The Professors Connelly and Morris are UVA Psychology professors and experts in the field of translational neuroscience. Both have served as College Fellows, working with many of the best thought leaders and course design experts on grounds. With extensive understanding of the challenges and opportunities of educating first year scholars, we present a course opportunity for all who wish to better understand how to build a healthy human.

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Neuroscience

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PSYC 3559 Section 200: How to Build A Healthy Human Brain (Can be taken for Psychology or Neuroscience Area but not both) Be sure and enroll in Section 200 and add a  discussion section as well or you cannot enroll
Credits:  3

Faculty: Jessica Connelly and James Morris

*Note:  How to Build A Healthy Human Brain may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

The social, mental, and physical well-being of humans is dependent upon slow maturation of a number of critical biological systems over the course of the lifespan. Biological and environmental influences on the maturation of these systems are vast and varied. Though unique, contributions of developmental environment and biological predisposition are often considered as independent predictors but modern science has demonstrated time and again that the two are richly intertwined. This Signature J-Term survey course examines how early life experience shapes the function of our genome, impacts the development of brain systems involved in the complexities of human life, and sets the stage for our abilities to forge new social bonds that promote healthy lives and rewarding personal experiences. Through lectures from thought experts across several fields of science, we will discuss how modern society has introduced many challenges to these developmental experiences including social, environmental and educational inequality, which are a direct threat to these natural human processes. The Professors Connelly and Morris are UVA Psychology professors and experts in the field 

of translational neuroscience. Both have served as College Fellows, working with many of the best thought leaders and course design experts on grounds. With extensive understanding of the challenges and opportunities of educating first year scholars, we present a course opportunity for all who wish to better understand how to build a healthy human.

PSYC 3210-001:  Psychobiology Laboratory
Credits:  3

Faculty: Erin Clabough

Modern behavioral neuroscience is a vibrant, multidisciplinary field that makes uses of a wide range of methods for measuring, analyzing, and predicting how brains work to process information and generate complex behaviors. The overall goal of this course is to understand basic ways that psychologists can study the brain in a laboratory setting. To gain a deeper insight into psychological foundations, we will survey concepts, literature, and methods from several subfields of neuroscience.  This hands-on, writing intensive course develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, histology, mapping of neural pathways, behavioral analysis, and genetic analyses. We will step into the shoes of different types of biopsychologists in each of our modules. The goal is to teach you to think like a scientist, so be prepared for hands-on activities, discussion, and learning by doing.healthy human.healthy human.

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Philosophy

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ANTH 2559-100/PHIL 2500-100 The Past, Present, and Future of Humankind

Faculty: Erin Eaker and Rachel Most (Philosophy and Anthropology)

What does it mean, in the present day, to be a human being? Where did we come from? Where are we going? Drawing from the disciplines of anthropology, archaeology, evolutionary biology, psychology, and philosophy, we will explore the deep history of how we—the species Homo sapiens—evolved. We will focus on the evolution of those traits that seem so distinctively human, such as language, abstract thought, agriculture, art, mythmaking, and morality. We will study what makes civilizations rise and fall, and we will take stock of where we are as a species at the present moment. Will the traits that made us such a successful species help us rise to the challenges of the future? Or are we doomed by our very nature? In addition to synchronous talks by Most, Eaker, and guest lecturers (e.g., Roy Scranton, James Scott, Cullen Murphy), students will actively engage with the material through book club discussions of the readings, small group chat-enabled video viewings, interactive games that model civilization building and collapse, and frequent writing exercises to synthesize what they have learned.

PHIL 2500-002 Slurs

Faculty: Corin Fox 

This course will study the philosophy of language with a heavy emphasis on pragmatics, and the sub-topic of slurs and derogation. I envision it covering some standard-fare questions about meaning and reference, and a bit on names and descriptions. Yet I want to focus it more on basic distinctions between ‘semantics’ and ‘pragmatics’, and related concepts like speech acts, implicature, presupposition, context-sensitivity, and ambiguity. Additionally, I am eager to accent the ‘human’ elements, including the phenomenology of slur use for speaker and hearer, as well as questions about linguistic appropriation, reclaiming, and in/out group differences in language norms. 

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Fall 2020

Cognitive Psychology

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6)

multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  Smyth (Section 1) Morris (Section 2)

 

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Teles Santos Golino

 

PSYC 2160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2005 or 3005 with a grade of C or higher

Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (2005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Meyer/Schmidt/Smyth

PSYC 3100-1: Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior 
*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: The course will examine historical and current theories of learning that provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. Students will be exposed to a diverse range of experimental findings that led to principles and concepts that currently explain how environmental, social and emotional factors influence the brain and body to shape human and animal behavior.

Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4500 (Section 1) Disease, Health, and the Psyche
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: Covers topics from health psychology, psychoneuroimmunology, and behavioral medicine in order to acquire a basic understanding of physical health and the immune system and how they relate to the nervous system and various psychological processes.

Instructor: Horn

PSYC 4500 (Section 3) Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4500 (Section 6): Brain Mapping with MRI 
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.
Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 4607: Uniquely Human Social Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. In this course we will examine the evolutionary, developmental, and brain foundations that underpin our ultrasocial nature.
Instructor: Grossman

PSYC 5705: Introduction to Bayesian Methods
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions: 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: This course will provide a practical introduction to classic and modern Bayesian methods, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences. Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.

Instructor: Tong

PSYC 5710:  Machine Learning and Data Mining
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None      
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents:  While most psychological studies ask "is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", ie., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups.
Instructor:  Golino

 

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Neuroscience

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Neuroscience

NESC 4265:  Developmental Neurobiology

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050

Enrollment Restrictions: Must have completed PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050.  If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.

Description of course contents: The diverse functions of the nervous system depend on precise wiring of connections between neurons. This course will cover cellular and molecular processes of how neuronal connections are established during development, especially the role of activity- and experience-dependent plasticity in postnatal development. Diseases, which result from failing to establish the circuitry in early development, will also be discussed. This course will introduce research methods and technology, and encourage students to develop skills to appreciate historical context and logical rationale of contemporary research.

Instructor: Liu

PSYC 2160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long  

PSYC 2200-1: Survey of Neural Basis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 3100-1: Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior 
*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: The course will examine historical and current theories of learning that provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. Students will be exposed to a diverse range of experimental findings that led to principles and concepts that currently explain how environmental, social and emotional factors influence the brain and body to shape human and animal behavior.

Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200 or BIOL 3050; PSYC 3005 recommended

Enrollment Restrictions: Must have completed PSYC 2200, 4200, or BIOL 3050.  If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.

Description of course contents: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings.

Instructor: Clabough/Morris

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior

Credits:  4

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 2210

Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents: Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. PSYC 3210 is recommended.

Instructor:  Ribic

PSYC 4500 (Section 3) Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4500 (Section 6): Brain Mapping with MRI 
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology

* Note:  BIOL 3050 OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  Must have completed BIOL 2100 (formerly BIOL 2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (formerly BIOL 2020) or BIOL 2040

Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040.  May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170. Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.

Instructors:  Condron

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Linguistics

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ANTH 2400: Language and Culture

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

Instructor: East

ANTH 2430: Languages of the World

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

Instructor:  Mirzayan

ANTH 3480: Language and Prehistory

Credits:  3

Description of course contents: This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time – and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistory population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA

Instructor: Danziger

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Languages
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology
Instructor:  Sicoli

ANTH 5475:  Multimodal Interaction
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  LNGS 3250 or another Linguistics course
Description of course contents: Students build knowledge and practice of analysis of peoples' joint-engagement in embodied interactions. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of verbal and non-verbal actions. Prior coursework in Linguistics, Anthropology or instructor permission recommended. Instructor:  Sicoli

ASL 3450-001: Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse and compares/contrasts them using real-world examples. Describes major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing/contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages.

Instructor:  Jennings-Arey

CLAS 3350 Language and Literature of the Early Celts

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and Britain unites two approaches, one literary, one linguistic. First, we will compare descriptions of the Celts found in Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland's great prose epic, the Táin Bó Cúailnge. Second, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish as well as touching on Middle Welsh and Gaulish.

Instructor: Staff

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

FREN 3030: Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

Instructor: Saunders

LING 3400: Structure of English

(obligatory 1 credit discussion)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures.  Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation.  Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation.  Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Crabtree

LING 3559: Semantics and Pragmatics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course looks closely and critically at theories that ask what kinds of categories words and constructions denote (semantics) and theories that ask how linguistic form is related to conversational context (pragmatics). Using elicited data and contextual/natural phrases and sentences, we will attempt to generalize about the cues and information that humans use to construct meaning as they speak. Course fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics. 

Instructor:  Mirzayan

LING 5409: Acoustic Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: To acquire a good understanding of speech sounds, we must understand how speech sounds are produced, the physical nature of the sounds, and how the ear and brain work to recognize sounds as carriers of meaning distinguishing units in speech. In this course we investigate these processes by focusing on three broad questions: (1) How do we produce speech in communication? (2) How do we perceive speech in communication? and (3) How does the nature of these processes influence the sound patterns of languages in the world? In the process of doing so will also be learning experimental and analytical techniques that enable us to carefully investigate these (and other related) questions.

Instructor:  Mirzayan

LNGS 3250: Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

(optional 1 credit discussion section)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Elson

RUSS 5030: Advanced Russian I

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  RUSS 2010, 2020, and Instructor Consent

Description of course contents: A thorough review of Russian grammar.

Instructor: Elson

SPAN 4202: Hispanic Sociolinguistics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Instructor Permission SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and SPAN 3000; or SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and 3200

Description of course contents: This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and bilingualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.

Instructor: Velázquez-Mendoza

SPAN 4210: History of the Spanish Language II

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or 3200

Description of course contents: The course examines the development of the Spanish language through texts produced from the Middle Ages to the present day. The main goal will be the interpretation of individual texts as a source of linguistic data and the analysis of language in its cultural, social and historical context. Including texts from Latin American and Spain, the commentary will cover the analysis of phonological, grammatical and lexical aspects. Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200

Instructor: Velázquez-Mendoza

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Philosophy

PHIL 1510: Ethics of Computing Technologies
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: Developments in computing technology have had a tremendous impact on our lives.  Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited.  In this course we will examine some of these changes and carefully consider their social and ethical implications, from the political and global to the personal and emotional.  We’ll end by thinking about computing changes that lie ahead – including the distant future.
Instructor:  Staff

PHIL 2500: Minds, Machines, and Persons
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course surveys foundational issues in the philosophy of cognitive science and mind. Part 1 addresses foundational questions about cognition. Is the mind a brain? A computer? Does the mind extend into the body and environment? What is a mental representation? Part 2 turns to the so-called “Hard Problem” of consciousness: can a physicalist theory of mind explain conscious experience? Part 3 concludes with the problem of personal identify over time. Once you were a kid, now you are an adult, and one day you'll grow old. What (if anything) makes you the same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Langsam

PHIL 3500-001: Animals and Ethics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
This course will examine the moral status of non-human animals and what the major ethical theories imply for our treatment of animals, including for the purposes of scientific research and food.  In an effort to understand how we should think about their moral status, we will also examine the questions of whether, and to what extent, animals experience pain and emotions.
Instructor:  Greenway

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Computer Science

Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I 

Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

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Elective Credit Only

PSYC 4500 Practical Longitudinal Sustainability Studies
Credits:  3 (NOTE: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement)
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: Longitudinal data analytical techniques will be introduced to investigate sustainability issues.

Instructor: Tong

BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development

Credits:  1 (NOTES: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement and is only one credit hour)

Requisites: Instructor Permission

Description of course contents:  This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.

Instructor:  Deppmann