Approved Courses

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Spring 2019


Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor: Smyth (Section 1) TBD (Section 2)

PSYC 2150: Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 2160: Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note: PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both
Credits: 3
Description of course contents:  This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.
Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Meyer (section 1), Schmidt (Section 2)

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory
*Note:  PSYC 3210 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3   Prerequisites: PSYC 2200 or 4200; PSYC 3005 recommended
Enrollment Restrictions: If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Four laboratory hours.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 3435:  Educational Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2150 (with grade of B- or higher highly recommended) and PSYC 2700
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies; and proposed reforms for American education.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 3490 Infant Development
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 1010
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents Infancy is the time of life during which enormous changes take place- newborns are very different from the inquisitive, walking and talking 2-year-old. The following lines of development during the first two years are traced in detail: motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Environmental influences, including parental behavior are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on caregivers.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 3495/LASE 3559: The Science and Lived Experience of Autism II

Credits: 6 (this is a year long course)
Description of course contents: This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.
Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4112/ASL4112: Psychology and Deaf People 
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and a 4th year major/minor in psychology.
Description of course contents:  This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people.  Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.
Instructor:  Hanumantha

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

PSYC 4559-3 Neural Basis of Empathy in Children
*Note: PSYC 4559-3 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: This course is designed to provide in-depth experience with the concepts, methods, and techniques used in empathy research. Students will delve into scientific articles on the biological basis of emotional empathy, perspective takingm prosocial behavior, and compassion and learn how these skills can be modulated.
Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 5160: Emotion and Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: The cognition-emotion seminar covers the connection between thinking and feeling in two ways. The first part asks about the causes of emotion, and the second asks about the consequences of emotion.  Part 1 concerns the nature and definition of emotion and the role of cognitive appraisals in their elicitation and intensity. Distinctions will be made among concepts such as affect, emotion, mood, and temperament.  Part 2 concerns the consequences of emotion for cognition, experience, and behavior.  Of interest will be such topics as the effects on judgment and decision-making, processing and performance, and memory and attention, and the role of culture. and machine learning.
Instructor: Clore

PSYC 5312:  Neurodevelopmental Conditions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology major/minor and Cognitive Science majors. Cannot be enrolled in (or have taken) another Psyc 4000+ course.
Description of course contents: It is estimated that 15% of individuals in the U.S. are affected by a neurodevelopmental disability, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, intellectual disability, and impairments in vision and hearing. This interdisciplinary, discussion-based seminar will address the etiology and course of some of these disabilities, drawing on theoretical models, experimental findings, and the lived experience.
Instructor: Jaswal

PSYC 5559-2 Quantified Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: The class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on the problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have the potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 5710:  Machine Learning and Data Mining
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None      
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents:  While most psychological studies ask "is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", ie., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups.
Instructor:  Golino

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Neuroscience

PSYC 2160: Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note: PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both
Credits: 3
Description of course contents:  This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.
Instructor:  Long

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None

Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.

Instructor: Brunjes

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory
*Note:  PSYC 3210 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3   Prerequisites: PSYC 2200 or 4200; PSYC 3005 recommended
Enrollment Restrictions: If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Four laboratory hours.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 3559-002/BIOL 3559/NESC 3559:  Neuroscience Through the Nobels
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: Will introduce Nobel-winning discoveries that shaped our understanding of the nervous system; explore the original experimental basis for these discoveries; and learn about the Nobel laureates. This course will enable students to acquire a deeper understanding of fundamental principles in Neuroscience, to familiarize with various research techniques, and to develop a sense of history of Neuroscience research.  
Instructor: Cang

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior

* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits:  4
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and Instructor Permission

Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors /Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors

Description of course contents:  Lectures and discussions on molecular and cellular aspects of neural mechanisms as they relate to behavior. Topics will include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, neuropharmacology, cortical organization and function, plasticity and neurodegenerative diseases.   

Instructor:  Hill

 

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4559-3 Neural Basis of Empathy in Children
*Note: PSYC 4559-3 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS
Description of course contents: This course is designed to provide in-depth experience with the concepts, methods, and techniques used in empathy research. Students will delve into scientific articles on the biological basis of emotional empathy, perspective takingm prosocial behavior, and compassion and learn how these skills can be modulated.
Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 5270:  Computational Neuroscience
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS

Description of course contents:  Develops skills in processing neural data and analyzing its relationship to stimulus or motor activity. Topics include information theory, receptive fields, point processes, and mixed-effects models. Emphasis is on implementing theoretical concepts with computer programs.

Instructor:  Meliza

 

PSYC 5326:  The Neuroscience of Social Relationships
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 3005. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170) also recommended 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS

Description of course contents:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end.
Instructor:  Coan

 

PSYC 5559-1 Brain Evolution
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course or GSAS

Description of course contents: Seminar examining the role of evolution in shaping the vertebrate brain.
Instructor: Brunjes

 

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2100 (2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (2020)

Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor: Kawasaki

 

BIOL 4190:  Biological Clocks
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020

Description of course contents:  Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation.
Instructor: Menaker 

 

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  Examines the anatomy, physiology, and molecular biology of many sensory modalities such as vision, audition, and chemosensation. General features of sensory systems are described.
Instructor:  Provencio

 

BIOL 4340:  Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 (previously BIOL 3170) or PSYC 4200
Description of course contents:  The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor: Mellon

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Linguistics

ANTH 2410 Sociolinguistics
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Description of course contents: Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.
Instructor: Lefkowitz
 
ANTH 2430: Languages of the World
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
Instructor: Beer
 
ANTH 3455/7455: African Languages
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course.
Instructor: Beer

ANTH 3480: Language and Prehistory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time – and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistory population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA
Instructor:  Danziger

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 5401: Linguistic Field Methods
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  The goal of this course is to get hands-on practice doing linguistic analysis based entirely on data collected from a native speaker of a language. [NOTE: “entirely” means that you should not look up already-published grammars and dictionaries or search the web for descriptions of the language we are working on. For the purposes of this course, we will act as if no grammar or dictionary yet exists.]  We will work collaboratively on the same language for the whole semester.  Data collection will begin with phonetic transcription of individual words, with the goal of learning to hear the phonetic detail of an unfamiliar language, and the first assignment will be an analysis of the phonemes of the language, including rules for allophonic variation where relevant. After working out the phonemic system, we will move to analysis of grammar (word structure and phrase/sentence structure), starting with phrases and sentences and going on to a short text. Instructor: Contini-Morava

ANTH 5440: Morphology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One Linguistics course (preferred) or Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation) and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar.
Instructor: Dobrin

ANTH 5475: Multimodal Interaction
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:  Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis.

Instructor: Sicoli 

EDHS 4030: Speech and Hearing Science

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work. 

Instructor: Filipe Loncke

ENLS 3030: History of the English Language
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Description of course contents: Studies the development of English word forms and vocabulary from Anglo-Saxon to present-day English.
Instructor: Baker
 
FREN 3030: Phonetics
Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.
Instructor: Gladys Saunders
 

FREN 4509:  Seminar in French Linguistics: L’individu bilingue / the bilingual speaker

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: FREN 3032; a keen interest in the French language; and a

willingness to speak French in class—students taking this course must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom

Description of course contents: Nearly half the people in the world speak more than one language every day; and in France, some 13 million speakers use regularly several languages. Yet, says expert (renowned psycholinguist) François Grosjean, “le bilinguisme reste méconnu et victime d’idées reçues” (especially in France where, historically, a linguistic policy of monolingualism has been promoted).In this seminar we shall explore the many facets of the bilingual and bicultural individual (focusing particularly on the two languages that everyone taking the course will speak: French and English). Our guide will be Grosjean’s 2015 book, Parler plusierus langues: le monde des bilingues (an excellent analysis of the complex field for the French audience). Through our study of Grosjean and other sources, we will (1) gain insight into some of the persistent myths about bilingualism and bilinguals; (2) acquire deeper knowledge of the linguistic characteristics of the bilingual speaker (e.g., code switching, the principle of complementarity, language dominance, mixed linguistic systems, accent retention, problems in translating / interpreting . . .); (3) advance our understanding of how one becomes bilingual (linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects) ; (4) observe how others (writers, translators, artists, teachers, etc.) speak about bilingual/bicultural individuals in their work, and much more. Students will conduct fieldwork, record and analyze oral interviews, give oral presentations and contribute daily to the in-class discussions on assigned readings and film clips.The seminar is taught in French. Participants must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom, as well as outside the classroom (some field projects will require the use of French).FREN 4509 counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics Program.

Instructor:  Saunders

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams 

 
SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics
Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor: Mendoza (001) and Korfhagen (002)
 

SPAN 3200: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Instructor Consent Required

Description of course contents: This course offers a formal description of the Spanish language from the following angles of the linguistic discipline: language variation, change and acquisition; phonetics/phonology, morphology, and syntax. Counts for major credit in Spanish and Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Scida

 

SPAN 4200: History of the Language

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or department placement. Instructor Consent Required

Description of course contents:

Instructor: Rini

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Philosophy

PHIL 1510: Introductory Seminar—The Ethics of Computing (Section 1 or 2)
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: Developments in computing technology have had a tremendous impact on our lives.  Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited.  In this course we will examine some of these changes and carefully consider their social and ethical implications, from the political and global to the personal and emotional.  We’ll end by thinking about computing changes that lie ahead – including the distant future.

Instructor:  Thyrion

 

PHIL 2500: Survey on A Philosophical Topic: Animal Minds (Section 100)
Credits:  3 (Required Discussion)
Description of course contents: What does the world look like to an octopus? Other species seem to represent objects in their environments, think about the thoughts of their conspecifics, and perhaps even use language to communicate. Some seem to have long-term memory, emotion, and self-awareness. Do they in fact do all of these things, and if so, how, and in what sense? We will engage philosophically with the best scientific evidence to answer these and similar questions. Finally, we will consider the implications of our answers: What have we learned about the nature of our own minds, and the place of humanity in the world?
Instructor: Ott

 

PHIL 2500: Survey on A Philosophical Topic: Philosophy of Neuroscience
Credits:  3 (Required Discussion)

Prerequisites:  Instructor Consent Required
Description of course contents: This course surveys the philosophical foundations of neuroscience, with an eye to how those foundations are shifting in the 21st century. Part 1 considers whether psychology can be reduced to neuroscience, or whether the fields must work hand-in-hand to produce multi-level explanations of the mind. Part 2 looks critically at a foundational assumption in neuroscience: cognitive functions (such as speech production) are localized in brain regions (such as Broca’s area). We survey challenges to localization from neuroimaging (reverse inference) and philosophy (neural reuse). We then consider we must revise our ontology of the brain to meet these challenges. Part 3 considers other questions in neuroimaging, such as whether neuroimages are photos of the brain and how to interpret resting state data.   

Instructor:  Irving

 

PHIL 2640: Rational Choice and Happiness
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: In this class, we will examine philosophical puzzles about our ability to make rational choices that affect or determine our own happiness. How can we rationally decide to undergo a significant experience – such as having a child or moving to a new country – when we have no way of knowing what that experience will be like? How can we rationally choose to make decisions about our future?

Instructor:  Barnes

 

PHIL 3400: Introduction to Non-Classical Logic
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: An introduction to systems of non-classical logic, including both extensions and revisions to classical logic.  We will look at logical systems that extend classical logic to deal with the phenomena of possibility and time.  We will look at logics that revise classical logic to allow for sentences which are neither true nor false, or sentences which can be both.  We will show how these departures from classical logic can shed light on various philosophical questions.

Instructor:  Cameron

 

PHIL 3500: Seminar in Philosophy: Philosophy of Memory
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: Memory is central to human life. For better or worse, memory keeps our childhoods with us, shaping who we are and how we view ourselves. Memory gives us access to innumerable facts: the names of recent Prime Ministers, the capital of Ontario, Plato’s vocation, etc. Without memory, we would be doomed to repeat our mistakes, unable to follow through on our promises and projects, and incapable of taking responsibility for our sins and successes. This course explores the nature of memory and its philosophical significance, and breaks down into three topics. Part 1: What is Memory contrasts experiential and causal theories of memory, testing them against both philosophical, behavioral, and neural evidence. We will also ask whether memories extend into external objects such as smartphones. What we learn about memory in Part 1 will inform our discussions of the broader philosophical significance of memory throughout the course. Part 2: Memory and Knowledge asks whether we should dogmatically accept that our memories are true, especially in light of psychological research on the reconstructive nature of memory. Part 3: Memory and Personhood examines whether memory is required to remain the same person over time. We will discuss classic answers to this question, as well as complications that arise when we discuss empirical evidence for reconstructive memories, neurological deficits concerning memory, and the memories of children and non-human animals.

Instructor:  Irving

 

PHIL 3652: Animals and Ethics
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course will examine the moral status of non-human animals and what the major ethical theories imply for our treatment of animals, including for the purposes of scientific research and food.  In an effort to understand how we should think about their moral status, we will also examine the questions of whether, and to what extent, animals experience pain and emotions.

Instructor:  Akhtar

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Computer Science

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.
 
The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:
CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  
CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I 
 
IMPORTANT: You can find a list of dates when CS courses open up to Cognitive Science majors on the following document https://docs.google.com/document/d/1r6q1_2A1sP9cTFlWsUAf8_zJnUfla6syaBenICYe7ac/edit