Approved Courses

Cognitive Science Current Approved Courses for Spring 2018  

 Link to Class Search in SIS

Cognitive Psychology

EDLF 5260: Cognitive Psychology and Education
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: This course will include both cognitive psychology and education perspectives, focusing on what cognitive psychology can tell us about how people learn and how to apply that knowledge in education. We will focus on the ways that cognitive psychology research can be designed and evaluated to be most informative in addressing practical questions of education and learning, including research questions, populations, methods, etc.
Instructor:  Jirout
 
PSYC 2559: Mechanisms of Human Memory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  
Instructor:  Sederberg
 
PSYC 3005-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth
 
PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Schmidt
 
PSYC 3435:  Educational Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2150 (with grade of B- or higher highly recommended) and PSYC 2700
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies; and proposed reforms for American education.
Instructor:  Willingham 
 
PSYC 3495: The Science and Lived Experience of Autism II
Credits: 6 (this is a year long course)
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  
Description: This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.
Instructor: Jaswal
 
PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke
 
PSYC 4112: Psychology and Deaf People 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and a 4th year major/minor in psychology.
Description of course contents:  This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people.  Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.
Instructor:  Hanumantha
 
PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams 
 
PSYC 4559-1: Construction and Validation of Assessment Tools
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology major/minor and Cognitive Science majors. Cannot be enrolled in (or have taken) another Psyc 4000+ course.
Description of course contents: This course will introduce the basic notions and strategies used in the construction and validation of assessment instruments (e.g. tests and questionnaires). 
Instructor: Golino

PSYC 4682/SYS 4581:  Using Mobile Technology in Mental Health Research
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents: This course provides an introduction to research design and computational methods for non-invasive mental health monitoring using mobile devices such as phones and wearable computing. Students will gain a practical understanding of mobile monitoring approaches as they relate to mental health. Topics include estimating health status (e.g. mood) through mobility data, application design, mobile data mining, and emerging issues in mental health.
Instructors:  Daros

PSYC 5325:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5325 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3005 or Graduate Standing
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  Several approaches have been used to investigate relations between mind (or cognition) and brain.  For example, the case study perspective focuses on cognitive deficits of patients with localized brain damage, and the cognitive neuroscience perspective attempts to determine the neurobiological substrates of cognitive processes in normal humans, usually by means of structural or functional neuroimaging.  Both of these perspectives will be covered in this course, and one of the goals will be to attempt to integrate findings from different approaches to studying mind-brain relations.
Instructor:  Salthouse 
 
PSYC 5559-1: Introduction to Machine Learning for Psychologists
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents: This course will introduce the basic notions and models used in the field of machine learning. This is a hands-on course on supervised (classification and regression) and unsupervised learning techniques designed for psychologists.
Instructor: Golino
 
PSYC 5559-2: Topics in the Evolution of the Mind
*Note:  PSYC 5559-2 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:
Instructor: Meliza
 
PSYC 5559-3: Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology major/minor and Cognitive Science majors. Cannot be enrolled in (or have taken) another Psyc 4000+ course.
Description of course contents:It is estimated that 15% of individuals in the U.S. are affected by a neurodevelopmental disability, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, intellectual disability, and impairments in vision and hearing. This interdisciplinary, discussion-based seminar will address the etiology and course of some of these disabilities, drawing on theoretical models, experimental findings, and the lived experience. Requirements will include regular reaction papers, presentations, and a term paper.
Instructor: Jaswal
 
PSYC 5705: Introduction to Bayesian Methods
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions: 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: This course will provide a practical introduction to classic and modern Bayesian methods, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences. Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.
Instructor: Tong
 
PSYC 5720:  Fundamentals of Item Response Theory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3005/3006 or PSYC 4005/4006
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course is designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of item response theory (IRT) and their application to substantive psychological problems of measuring traits and abilities using tests, scales, and measures. IRT techniques are extremely useful for evaluating existing measures and developing new measures. These methods can be used with a variety of assessments, in many areas, such as psychology, education, health, and business, where measures of cognitive ability, achievement, attitudes and traits are of interest. We will also explore topics such as differential item functioning (DIF), where items are used differently by different groups (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, SES, etc.). By the end of this semester you should be able to: a) understand and apply the principles of IRT in your own research and in evaluating the research of others, b) perform and interpret IRT model analyses for dichotomous and polytomous data, using various IRT programs, and c) communicate IRT research findings to an audience of psychologists.
Instructor:  Schmidt

Neuroscience

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.
Instructor: Brunjes
 
PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200; PSYC 3005 recommended
Enrollment Restrictions:
If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description:  Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Four laboratory hours.
Instructor: Liu
 
PSYC 5265:  Functional Neuroanatomy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3170
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain.
Instructor:  Brunjes
 
PSYC 5325:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5325 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3005 or Graduate Standing
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  Several approaches have been used to investigate relations between mind (or cognition) and brain.  For example, the case study perspective focuses on cognitive deficits of patients with localized brain damage, and the cognitive neuroscience perspective attempts to determine the neurobiological substrates of cognitive processes in normal humans, usually by means of structural or functional neuroimaging.  Both of these perspectives will be covered in this course, and one of the goals will be to attempt to integrate findings from different approaches to studying mind-brain relations.
Instructor:  Salthouse 
 
PSYC 5326:  The Neuroscience of Social Relationships
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 3005. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170) also recommended 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end.
Instructor:  Coan 
 
PSYC 5559-2: Topics in the Evolution of the Mind
*Note:  PSYC 5559-2 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:   4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:
Instructor: Meliza
 
PSYC 5559-3: Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology major/minor and Cognitive Science majors. Cannot be enrolled in (or have taken) another Psyc 4000+ course.
Description of course contents:It is estimated that 15% of individuals in the U.S. are affected by a neurodevelopmental disability, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, intellectual disability, and impairments in vision and hearing. This interdisciplinary, discussion-based seminar will address the etiology and course of some of these disabilities, drawing on theoretical models, experimental findings, and the lived experience. Requirements will include regular reaction papers, presentations, and a term paper.
Instructor: Jaswal
 
BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2100 (2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (2020)
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor:  Kawasaki
 
BIOL 4190:  Biological Clocks
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020
Description of course contents:  Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation.
Instructor:  Menaker
 
BIOL 4320:  Signal Transduction:  How Cells Talk to Each Other
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010
Description of course contents:  This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment.  This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans.  Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment.
Instructor:  Deppmann
 
BIOL 4340:  Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 (previously BIOL 3170) or PSYC 4200
Description of course contents:  The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor:  Mellon

Linguistics

ASL 3450: Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse and compares/contrasts them using real-world examples. Describes major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing/contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages.
Instructor:  Staff
 
ANTH 2410:  Sociolinguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava
 
ANTH 2430: Languages of the World
Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
Instructor: Beer
 
ANTH 3490: Language and Thought
Description of course contents: There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research.
Instructor: Eve Danziger
 
ANTH 5401: Linguistic Field Methods
Description of course contents: The goal of this course is to get hands-on practice doing linguistic analysis based entirely on data collected from a native speaker of a language. [NOTE: “entirely” means that you should not look up already-published grammars and dictionaries or search the web for descriptions of the language we are working on. For the purposes of this course, we will act as if no grammar or dictionary yet exists.]  We will work collaboratively on the same language for the whole semester.  Data collection will begin with phonetic transcription of individual words, with the goal of learning to hear the phonetic detail of an unfamiliar language, and the first assignment will be an analysis of the phonemes of the language, including rules for allophonic variation where relevant. After working out the phonemic system, we will move to analysis of grammar (word structure and phrase/sentence structure), starting with phrases and sentences and going on to a short text.
Instructor: Ellen Contini-Morava
 
ANTH 5541-1:  Topics in Linguistics:  Linguistic Typology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents: 
Instructor:  Beer
 
EDHS 4030: Speech and Hearing Science
Description of course contents: The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work. 
Instructor: Filipe Loncke
 
FREN 3030: Phonetics
Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.
Instructor: Gladys Saunders
 
FREN 4509:  Seminar in French Linguistics, The Bilingual Speaker
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: FREN 3032; a keen interest in the French language; and a willingness to speak French in class—students taking this course must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom
Description of course contents: FREN 4509 Seminar in French Linguistics: L’individu bilingue / the bilingual speaker. Nearly half the people in the world speak more than one language every day; and in France, some 13 million speakers use regularly several languages. Yet, says expert (renowned psycholinguist) François Grosjean, “le bilinguisme reste méconnu et victime d’idées reçues” (especially in France where, historically, a linguistic policy of monolingualism has been promoted).In this seminar we shall explore the many facets of the bilingual and bicultural individual (focusing particularly on the two languages that everyone taking the course will speak: French and English). Our guide will be Grosjean’s 2015 book, Parler plusierus langues: le monde des bilingues (an excellent analysis of the complex field for the French audience). Through our study of Grosjean and other sources, we will (1) gain insight into some of the persistent myths about bilingualism and bilinguals; (2) acquire deeper knowledge of the linguistic characteristics of the bilingual speaker (e.g., code switching, the principle of complementarity, language dominance, mixed linguistic systems, accent retention, problems in translating / interpreting . . .); (3) advance our understanding of how one becomes bilingual (linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects) ; (4) observe how others (writers, translators, artists, teachers, etc.) speak about bilingual/bicultural individuals in their work, and much more.Students will conduct fieldwork, record and analyze oral interviews, give oral presentations and contribute daily to the in-class discussions on assigned readings and film clips. The seminar is taught in French. Participants must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom, as well as outside the classroom (some field projects will require the use of French).FREN 4509 counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics Program.
Instructor:  Saunders
 
LNGS 2240:  Southern American English
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  An examination of the structure, history, and sociolinguistics of the English spoken in the southeastern United States.
Instructor:  Elson
 
LNGS 5000: Linguistic Principles in Language Pedagogy
Description of course contents: Goals of the course: 1. To discuss the concept of communicative competence, and to evaluate its involvement in current language instruction and second language acquisition. 2. Proceeding from there, to think critically about the goals and obligations of second language instruction at the college/university (as opposed to high school) level. 3. To provide a basic understanding of linguistic systems, their structure, diversity (through an encounter with Hungarian or Turkish), and complexity, proceeding from the assumption that such knowledge is the underpinning of good language pedagogy (i.e., that good language pedagogy proceeds from knowledge of the nature of linguistic systems, making it possible for instructors to anticipate difficulties and thus plan the impartation of L2 structure in an informed manner). Prospective enrollees should note that this is NOT a course in methodology. No prerequisites, but permission of the instructor is required.
Instructor: Elson
 
PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke
 
PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams
 
SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics
Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor: Rini
 
SPAN 4203:  Structure of Spanish
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3015 and 3200
Description of course contents:  Seminar in Spanish linguistics. This is an
advanced introduction to the study of fundamental aspects of the sound and grammatical systems of the Spanish language. The course will start by analyzing present-day (syllable, word and phrase) structures of the language and it will progress toward a more detailed examination of some of the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Taught in Spanish.
Instructor:  Rini
 
SPAN 4210:  History of the Spanish Language II
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200
Description of course contents: The course examines the development of the Spanish language through texts produced from the Middle Ages to the present day. The main goal will be the interpretation of individual texts as a source of linguistic data and the analysis of language in its cultural, social and historical context. Including texts from Latin American and Spain, the commentary will cover the analysis of phonological, grammatical and lexical aspects. Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200
Instructor: Velasquez Mendoza
 
SPAN 4530: Second Language Acquisition
Description of course contents: How do people learn a second language (L2)? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition? How do we define “competence”? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics.
Instructor: Emily Scida

Philosophy

PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity. 
Instructor:  Schwartz

PHIL 2500: Animal Minds
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: What does the world look like to an octopus? Other species seem to represent objects in their environments, think about the thoughts of their conspecifics, and perhaps even use language to communicate. Some seem to have long-term memory, emotion, and self-awareness. Do they in fact do all of these things, and if so, how, and in what sense? We will engage philosophically with the best scientific evidence to answer these and similar questions. Finally, we will consider the implications of our answers: What have we learned about the nature of our own minds, and the place of humanity in the world?
Instructor:  Ott

PHIL 2500: Minds, Machines, and Persons
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course surveys foundational issues in the philosophy of cognitive science and mind. Part 1 addresses foundational questions about cognition. Is the mind a brain? A computer? Does the mind extend into the body and environment? What is a mental representation? Part 2 turns to the so-called “Hard Problem” of consciousness: can a physicalist theory of mind explain conscious experience? Part 3 concludes with the problem of personal identify over time. Once you were a kid, now you are an adult, and one day you'll grow old. What (if anything) makes you the same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Langsam

PHIL 3400: Introduction to Non-Classical Logic
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:
Instructor:  Cameron

Computer Science

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.
 
The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:
CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  
CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I 
 
IMPORTANT: You can find a list of dates when CS courses open up to Cognitive Science majors on the following document https://docs.google.com/document/d/1r6q1_2A1sP9cTFlWsUAf8_zJnUfla6syaBenICYe7ac/edit

 

 Frequently Approved Courses