Approved Courses

Cognitive Science Current Approved Courses for Fall 2017   

 Link to Class Search in SIS

Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2100:  Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  The course will examine historical and current theories that explain how different types of learning provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. We will cover these theories by carefully examining the most important research experiments that contributed to our current understanding of the principles and concepts that shape our behavior. The lecture content will focus heavily on experimental findings derived from research of learning processes in human and non-human species. The concept of Learning will be explored from the perspective of theories of Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, and more recent theories of the organization of behavior derived from human studies.
Instructor:  Williams
 
PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Jaswal
 
PSYC 2300:  Introduction to Perception
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  Proffitt
 
PSYC 2301:  Introduction to Perception Lab
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Simultaneous enrollment in PSYC 2300
Description of course contents:  Lab to accompany the study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  TBA
 
PSYC 3005-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth
 
PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Schmidt
 
PSYC 3425: History of Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Must have taken 3 PSYC courses
Enrollment Restrictions: 
Description of course contents:  Survey of the origins of psychology from the early philosophers to the current time.
Instructor:  Salthouse
 
PSYC 3559-003: Arts & Sciences and Civic Engagement: The Science and Lived Experience of Autism
Credits: 6 (this is a year long course)
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  
Description: This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.
Instructor: Jaswal
 
PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory
*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc. Instructor:  Williams
 
PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye witness testimony.  Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.
Instructor:  Dodson
 
PSYC 4559-003: Designing and Conducting Research with Children
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This laboratory course provides hands-on experience designing and conducting research with young children. The course is intended to guide students through the research experience, including reading research articles, proposing an original experiment, running participants and collecting data, analyzing data, and presenting findings in an academic poster
Instructor:  Taggart
 
PSYC 5160:  Emotion and Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.
Description of course contents: The cognition-emotion seminar covers the connection between thinking and feeling in two ways. The first part asks about the causes of emotion, and the second asks about the consequences of emotion.  Part 1 concerns the nature and definition of emotion and the role of cognitive appraisals in their elicitation and intensity. Distinctions will be made among concepts such as affect, emotion, mood, and temperament.  Part 2 concerns the consequences of emotion for cognition, experience, and behavior.  Of interest will be such topics as the effects on judgment and decision-making, processing and performance, and memory and attention, and the role of culture.
Instructor:  Clore
 
EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication
*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).
Instructor: Loncke
 

Neuroscience

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.
Instructor: Hill
 
PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200; PSYC 3005 recommended
Enrollment Restrictions:
If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description:  Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Four laboratory hours.
Instructor: TBA
 
PSYC 3559-2:  Behavior Genetics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:
If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents:  An introduction to the genetics of complex behavior in humans. Topics will include intelligence, personality and mental illness.  Focus will be on historical and philosophical aspects of the topic.
Instructor: Turkheimer
 
PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior
* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits:  4
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors /Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  Lectures and discussions on molecular and cellular aspects of neural mechanisms as they relate to behavior. Topics will include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, neuropharmacology, cortical organization and function, plasticity and neurodegenerative diseases.   
Instructor:  Erisir
 
PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory
*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc. Instructor:  Williams

 

PSYC 5559-1: Development of Sensory Systems

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and 4th year Psyc, Cog Sci or Neurosci major or GSAS.
Description of course contents:  This course is designed to explore the neurobiological development of mammalian sensory systems. In particular, we will concentrate on the mechanisms and processes involved in the development, plasticity, and maintenance of the developing visual and gustatory systems. Students will be expected to read and present original research articles and prepare summaries of research results, interpretations, and comparisons with other sensory systems
Instructor:  Hill
 
BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology
* Note:  BIOL 3050 OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2010 and 2020 or BIOL 2100 and 2200
Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.
Instructors:  Condron
 
BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250
Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.
Instructor:  Kawasaki
 
BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  Examines the anatomy, physiology, and molecular biology of many sensory modalities such as vision, audition, and chemosensation. General features of sensory systems are described.
Instructor:  Provencio
 
BIOL 4340:  Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 (previously BIOL 3170) or PSYC 4200
Description of course contents:  The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor:  Mellon
 
BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development
Credits:  1
Description of course contents:  This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.
Instructor:  Deppmann
 

Linguistics

 
ANTH 2400: Language and Culture
Description of course contents: A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.
Instructor: Sicoli
 
ANTH 2430: Languages of the World
Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
Instructor: Beer
 
ANTH 4420/7010: Theories of Language
Description of course contents: We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. This course fulfills the theory requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Instructor: Contini- Morava
 
ANTH 3455/7455: African Languages
Description of course contents: This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course.
Instructor: Beer
 
ANTH 5475: Multimodal Interaction
Description of course contents: Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.
Instructor: Sicoli
 
CLASS 3300/5300: Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Description of course contents: Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single “proto-language,” called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source? Familiarity with Greek or Latin is recommended but not required. This course fulfills the historical linguistics requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Instructor: George
 
EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication
*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).
Instructor: Loncke
 
ENMD 5010: Introduction to Old English
Description of course contents: This course will introduce you to English language and literature from before circa AD 1100-- the language of Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, and a number of other classics of medieval literature. We will begin with intensive study of the language (no prior knowledge of Old or Middle English is assumed) and the reading of simple texts. By the middle of the term we will have proceeded to more difficult prose texts and to poetry. Assignments will include (in addition to the readings) frequent exercises, bi-weekly quizzes, a final exam, and a short final paper. This course is a prerequisite for ENMD 5200, Beowulf.
Instructor: Baker
 
FREN 3030: Phonetics: The Sounds of French
Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics.  It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation.  The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, 'la musique du français', i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l'accent, l'intonation, la syllabation).  Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French. FREN 3030 counts for major/minor credit in French and in the Linguistics Program.
Instructor: Saunders
 
LNGS 3250/ 7010: Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis
(optional 1 credit discussion section)
Description of course contents: This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Instructor: Elson
 
LING 3400/ 7400: Structure of English
(obligatory 1 credit discussion)
Description of course contents: This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures.  Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation.  Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation.  Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Instructor: Crabtree
 
LING 5409: Acoustic Phonetics
Description of course contents: In this course on phonetics, students will explore the acoustic properties of different segment types, formants, pitch, intensity, spectra, and voice pulsing, among other phenomena. The emphasis is on parameters that influence speech intelligibility, the correlates of language variation (comparison between languages, effects of dialects), as well as some aspects of phonetic pathology. Prerequisites: LNGS 3250 or Instructor Permission
Instructor: Beer
RUSS 5030: Advanced Russian Grammar: Phonology and Morphology
Description of course contents: This course aims to provide a thorough review and elaboration of the spelling and inflectional morphology of Contemporary Standard Russian. Its aim is to help students, including those who are native speakers, acquire and consolidate a level of proficiency in the structure of Russian suitable for ordinary scholarly and instructional purposes at American universities. Although its content will help students in their preparation for the MA and PhD Russian Language Proficiency Tests at the University of Virginia, such preparation is not the goal of the course.
Instructor: Elson
 
SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics
Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor: Rini
 
SPAN 4202: Spanish Sociolinguistics
Description of course contents: This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and bilingualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.
Instructor: Velázquez-Mendoza

Philosophy

PHIL 2070: Knowledge and Reality
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:  This course examines our basic understanding of reality, and what this understanding tells us about the nature of the reality thus known. What can we know about the world?  How can we know it?  And what is the nature of the reality thus known?  We will examine influential answers to these questions, including: (I) skepticism, which denies that we can have genuine knowledge of external reality; (ii) idealism, which claims that the known world is dependent on, or even limited to, our own minds; and (iii) realism, which maintains that we can achieve knowledge of a mind-independent reality. The course will introduce philosophical methodology, and will familiarize students with some key issues in epistemology and metaphysics.  Readings will be taken from both historical and contemporary philosophers; these include Descartes, Hume, Russell, and Putnam, among others.
Instructor: McCready-Flora
 
PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:  A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity.
Instructor: Cameron
 
PHIL 2650: Free Will and Responsibility
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:  In deciding whether someone is responsible for something they’ve done, we routinely consider whether the person freely chose to perform that action: that is, whether the decision to act was an exercise of free will. The existence and even coherence of free will has been challenged by both scientists and philosophers. According to these skeptics, genuine responsibility requires that we possess free will; but since our decisions ultimately stem from factors external to us, we do not possess free will. Other philosophers maintain that, so long as your decision to do something is suitably your own—e.g., a decision that you endorse, and that reflects your values—then you are responsible for the corresponding action. In this course, we examine the problem of free will, scientific challenges to free will, and philosophical accounts of moral responsibility. Readings will be drawn from contemporary sources.
Instructor: Gertler
 
PHIL 3320: Epistemology
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: The course focuses on questions in the theory of knowledge. Topics include: skepticism about knowledge of the external world, the nature of justification, foundationalism, and coherentism, the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, a priori knowledge, the analytic/synthetic distinction, induction, and the ethics of belief.
Instructor: Langsam
 

Computer Science

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.
 
The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:
CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  
CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  
 

 

 Frequently Approved Courses