Approved Courses

Approved Cognitive Science Course Lists

All courses that will count  toward course requirements for the Cognitive Science major 30 credit hours must come from approved course lists on the website. Courses in each of the five core areas are reviewed each term by our area specialists and director to determine if they align with the study of cognitive science and contain suffient COGS specific content to count for the major. New and topical courses that change each term are added to the approved lists each term to expand course options within the disciplines.  We also have a list of courses that are frequently offered each year or every other year that were previously and are currently approved for COGS credit. The "Frequently Approved " course list can be found in the menu to the left. Courses that are listed on the website as approved will count for the major no matter when they were taken if you meet the criteria of C or above.

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Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Fall 2022


Psychology

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6)

multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

PSYC 2005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  TBD (Section 101) and TBD (Section 102)

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor: Willingham

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  STAT 1601 (C or higher) and PSYC 2005 or 3005 with a grade of C or higher

Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005 and STAT 1601 or higher
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (2005 and 3006).
Instructor: Schmidt (section 101 & 102)

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 3160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200 are recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza 

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 4100 Neuroscience of Learning, Emotions and Motivation of Functional Behavior
*Note:  PSYC 4100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Students must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science/Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents:  Learning, Emotions and Motivation will be explored from animal models of clinical conditions, historical case studies in humans of brain-derived emotional disturbances, and current innovations to treat brain disorders. These important discoveries will be presented for students to understand underlying biological and neural mechanisms that mediate adaptive changes to motivate healthy behavior.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 
*Note:  PSYC 4155 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Students must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4290: Memory Distortions

*Note:  PSYC 4290  may be used to fulfill either the COGS Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience major

Description of course contents: Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

Instructor: Dodson

PSYC 4310: Cognitive Aging
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI 
*Note:  PSYC 4420 may be used to fulfill either the COGS Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 or PSYC 3160
Enrollment Restrictions:  Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 4500: Cognitive Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents:

Instructor: Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4640: Psychology of Emotions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will survey contemporary research and theory in affective science. We will examine the origins, functions, and behavioral and social consequences of emotions, paying particular attention to cross-cultural and cross-species evidence.

Instructor: Wood

PSYC 5332: Quantified Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5332 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major, or second major in PSYC/COGS/NESC; GSAS or data science graduate.
Description of course contents: This class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor:  Sederberg

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Neuroscience

NESC 4265: Developmental Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200. Student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: The diverse functions of the nervous system depend on precise wiring of connections between neurons. This course covers cellular and molecular processes of how neuronal connections are established during development. Diseases which result from failing to establish the circuitry will also be discussed. This course will introduce research methods and technology, and encourage students to develop logical rationale of contemporary research.

Instructor: Liu

PSYC 2200-1: Survey of Neural Basis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Laboratory Required
Description of course contents: After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza 

PSYC 4100 Neuroscience of Learning, Emotions and Motivation of Functional Behavior
*Note:  PSYC 4100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Students must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents:  Learning, Emotions and Motivation will be explored from animal models of clinical conditions, historical case studies in humans of brain-derived emotional disturbances, and current innovations to treat brain disorders. These important discoveries will be presented for students to understand underlying biological and neural mechanisms that mediate adaptive changes to motivate healthy behavior.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 
*Note:  PSYC 4155 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240    Student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4290: Memory Distortions

*Note:  PSYC 4290  may be used to fulfill either the COGS Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience major

Description of course contents: Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

Instructor: Dodson

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 5332: Quantified Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5332 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major, or second major in PSYC/COGS/NESC; GSAS or data science graduate.
Description of course contents: This class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor:  Sederberg

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology

Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  Must have completed BIOL 2100 (formerly BIOL 2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (formerly BIOL 2020) or BIOL 2040

Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040.  May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170. Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.

Instructors:  Condron

BIOL 4045:  Neurodegenerative Diseases

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3050 and can’t enroll if previously taken BIOL 4559 topic #29 Neurodegenerative Diseases

Description of course contents:  This course for advanced undergrads will focus mainly on research about Alzheimer's disease, and will meet once/week for 3 hours. The first 3 weeks will be primarily didactic, and the remainder of the course will be a "journal club" in which primary research paper discussions will be led by teams of students. Assessments will be based on how well students lead and participate in discussions, and on exams.

Instructor:  Bloom

BIOL 4180:  Biological Clocks

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3010 or BIOL 3020

Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.

Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250

Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.

Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4280:  Genetic Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and 3010 required
Description of course contents:  This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction?   Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills.

Instructor: Hirsh

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Linguistics

ANTH 2400: Language and Culture

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior. No prior knowledge of linguistics is required.

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 2410: Sociolinguistics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents:  Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.No background in linguistics is presupposed.

Instructor: Lefkowitz

ANTH 2430: Languages of the World

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Dobrin

ANTH 2541: Topics in Linguistics: French Creole Language Structures

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents:This course examines the similarities and differences in phonology, morphology, and syntax among those creole languages whose primary lexicon is derived from French. We also consider broader linguistic and anthropological issues concerning creoles. For example, while some have claimed that creoles exist as a typologically distinct class of languages, others have argued that their only commonality is their socio-histories. Familiarity with French, though not required, will be useful. This course fulfills the Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and counts as a Linguistics requirement for Cognitive Science majors.

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 3450: Native American Languages (Designation: Non-Western)

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.

Instructor:  Jennings-Arey

ANTH 3480: Language and Prehistory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time – and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistory population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA.

Instructor:  Danziger

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology
Instructor:  Sicoli

ANTH 5541 100 Topics: Theory and Practice of Language Documentation
Credits: 3

Description of the course contents: This course explores the theoretical, practical, and ethical foundations of language documentation and linguistic fieldwork, forms of research that can hardly be separated in this era of global language shift and endangerment. How do the motivations of linguistic field research differ across interested constituencies, including scholars of various personal and academic backgrounds, the public, and speech communities themselves? What kinds of considerations, both linguistic and extralinguistic, must be addressed when planning and carrying out a linguistically-focused fieldwork project? Finally, we will think deeply about the audiovisual recordings and field notes that result from linguistic fieldwork: Who owns these artifacts? How should they be stored and presented? How should access to them be regulated? What is the relationship between these forms of linguistic data and the languages that they purport to represent? And to what extent can the outcomes of linguistic field research be reduced to such artifacts apart from the social relations that enabled their production?

Instructor: Dobrin

ASL 3450:  Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse and compares/contrasts them using real-world examples. Describes major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing/contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages.
Instructor:  Jennings-Arey

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

FREN 4509-001 Seminar in French Linguistics: The Bilingual Speaker

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  FREN 3030, 3031, and one 4000-level course in French

Description of course contents: Topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced undergraduate students.

Instructor: Saunders

LING 3400: Structure of English

(obligatory 1 credit discussion)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures.  Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation.  Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation.  Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Crabtree

LNGS 3250: Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

(optional 1 credit discussion section)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: Introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistics description. Emphasizes the application of descriptive techniques to data.

Instructor: Elson

LING 4650 Linguistic Typology

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: none

Description of the Course Contents: Linguistic typologists study the patterns of grammatical forms and relations as they vary and converge across the diversity of the world’s languages. Students in this course examine and critically evaluate definitions, methods and results of typological research, and gain practice analyzing linguistic data through typological lenses.

Instructor: Mirzayan

SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3010

Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Mendoza

SPAN 4530:  Spanish vis-à-vis Other Romance Languages

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3010 and 3300, or department placement, instructor permission

Description of course contents: Drawing on a comparative approach to language change, this course traces the primitive origins and historical development of the major linguistic changes taking place in the passage from Latin to Spanish and other Romance (i.e., Latin-derived) languages, mainly Portuguese, Italian, and French. Topics to be explored include: Expected and unexpected phonological changes in the neo-Latin language continuum; the role of analogy and ‘contamination’ in language change; etymological and non-etymological nasalization; the object + verb to verb + object shift; the prepositional direct object; pronominal replacement and duplication of direct and indirect objects.

Instructor: Mendoza

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Philosophy

PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity. Discussion Required.
Instructor:  Cameron

PHIL 2500 (Section 200): Minds, Machines, and Persons
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course surveys foundational issues in the philosophy of cognitive science and mind. Part 1 addresses foundational questions about cognition. Is the mind a brain? A computer? Does the mind extend into the body and environment? What is a mental representation? Part 2 turns to the so-called “Hard Problem” of consciousness: can a physicalist theory of mind explain conscious experience? Part 3 concludes with the problem of personal identify over time. Once you were a kid, now you are an adult, and one day you'll grow old. What (if anything) makes you the same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Irving

PHIL2820: Philosophy of Health and Healthcare

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents In this class, we’ll first discuss the question ‘what is health?’ How do we define what it means to be healthy? Is there a difference between physical and mental health? Is there a difference between health and overall well- being? Is health a biological concept or is it something normative? Then we’ll look at specific puzzles that arise in health care related to how we understand health and disease. For example, how do we measure health outcomes? How do we deal with the inherent subjectivity of some aspects of health, such as pain? What is the relationship between what we consider ‘healthy’ and what our culture values or stigmatizes?

Instructor: Barnes

PHIL 3010: Darwin and Philosophy

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents This course explores the history and the philosophical implications of Darwin’s revolutionary idea—that the unguided process of natural selection could explain the magnificent variety and adaptedness of living things and their descent from a common ancestor. We will look at Darwin’s historical, scientific and cultural context, and the evidence and arguments by which Darwin supported his theory. Philosophical topics will include: How are scientific theories supported by evidence? What makes evolutionary theory an accepted scientific theory? What are its moral implications? What does it tell us about human nature, how we should treat one another, and how we should relate to the environment upon which we depend?

same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Eaker

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Langsam

PHIL 3500: Seminar in Philosophy: Consciousness
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:

Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3620: Science Fiction and Philosophy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Science fiction is a distinctively philosophical genre. Science fiction stories can cause us to question the bounds of what is possible, explore ethical questions that arise in alien circumstances, explore the nature of the self and the very nature of reality, and so on. This course will investigate philosophical questions via science fiction literature, and use philosophy to explore the nature of science fiction.

Instructor:  Cameron

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Computer Science

Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. 

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110: Introduction to Programming
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. No previous programming experience required. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.

Instructor:  Pettit

CS 1111: Introduction to Programming
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students should have some experience with programming. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.

Instructor:  Apostolellis

CS 1112: Introduction to Programming
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students must have no previous programming experience. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.

Instructor:  Cohoon

CS 2100 Data Structures and Algorithms  1

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Must have completed CS 1110 or CS 1111 or CS 1112 or CS 1113 with a grade of C- or better OR successfully completed the CS 1110 place out test.
Description of course contents: A second course in computing with an emphasis on foundational data structures and program analysis. The course provides a introduction to object oriented programming and the Java programming language, concurrency, and inheritance / polymorphism. Additionally, foundational data structures and related algorithms / analysis are studied. These include lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and priority queues. Prereq: CS 1100 - CS 1199

Instructor 001: Horton; 002 & 003: Basit

CS 2120:  Discrete Mathematics and Theory 1

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 1110 or CS 1111 or CS 1112 or CS 1113 with a grade of C- or better OR successfully completed the CS 1110 place out test.
Description of course contents: Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include sets, tuples, functions, relations, and combinatorial problems. Prereq: CS 1100 - CS 1199

Instructor:  Orrico

CS 2130:  Computer Systems and Organization 1

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 1110 or CS 1111 or CS 1112 or CS 1113 with a grade of C- or better OR successfully completed the CS 1110 place out test.
Description of course contents: This course covers topics on the computer architecture abstraction hierarchy ranging from a step above silicon to a step below modern programming languages. Students in this course will learn to write low-level code in C and Assembly, how data is stored in memory, the basics of hardware design from gates and registers through general-purpose computers, and legal, ethical, and security issues related to these topics. CS 1100 - CS 1199 and either familiarity with Java, C++, or another C-like language, or concurrent enrollment in CS 2100

Instructor:  TBA

CS 2150:  Program and Data Representation

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Student must have completed CS 2110 with grades of C- or higher, or the CS 2110 placement test AND must be currently enrolled in or previously taken CS 2102 or CS 2120
Description of course contents: Introduces programs and data representation at the machine level. Data structuring techniques and the representation of data structures during program execution. Operations and control structures and their representation during program execution. Representations of numbers, arithmetic operations, arrays, records, recursion, hashing, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and related concepts. Prerequisite: CS 2110 with grades of C- or higher, or the CS 2110 placement test; co-requisite CS 2102 or CS 2120

Instructor:  Bloomfield

CS 3100 Data Structures and Algorithms  2

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 2100 and CS 2120

Description of course contents: Builds upon previous analysis of algorithms and the effects of data structures on them. Algorithms selected from areas such as searching, shortest paths, greedy algorithms, backtracking, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and machine learning. Analysis techniques include asymptotic worst case, expected time, amortized analysis, and reductions.CS 2100 and CS 2120; APMA 1090 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1310 or equivalent

Instructor:  Floryan

CS 3120:  Discrete Mathematics and Theory 2

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 3100 or CS 4102
Description of course contents: The goal of this course is to understand the fundamental limits on what can be efficiently computed. These limits reveal properties about information, communication, and computing, as well as practical issues about how to solve problems. Introduces computation theory including grammars, automata, and Turing machines. Prereq: CS 4102 or CS 3100

Instructor: Brunelle

CS 3130:  Computer Systems and Organization 2

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 2100 and CS 2130

Description of course contents: A second course in computer systems, this course will explore a more realistic model of processors and how they and the operating system work together to provide various functionality we depend on as application programmers. Course topics include permission models, system architecture, concurrency, virtual memory, cryptographic primitives, and TCP/IP networking. Prereq CS 2100 and CS 2130

Instructor:  Tychonievich

CS 3140:  Software Development Essentials

NOTE: This class may only be taken by students in new course curriculum (that is, students who took CS 2100 - DSA 1). If you took CS 2110 and CS 2150, you are not able to take this course.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 2100 and CS 2120

Description of course contents: A first course in software engineering and software construction, this course focuses on bringing the programming concepts learned in a first course in data structures and algorithms together to begin to teach students how to build more complex systems. The course covers introductory topics in testing, software design principles, design patterns, functional programming, and data storage and manipulation.

Instructor:  001-McBurney; 002-Nguyen

CS 3205: HCI in Software Development

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Must have completed CS 2100 and CS 2110

Description of course contents: Human-computer interaction and user-centered design in the context of software engineering. Examines the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction. Includes evaluating a system's usability based on well-defined criteria; user and task analysis, as well as conceptual models and metaphors; the use of prototyping for evaluating design alternatives; and physical design of software user-interfaces, including windows, menus, and commands. Prerequisite: CS 2110 or CS 2100

Instructor:  Apostolellis

PLEASE see additional CS 3000+ courses

Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

PSYC 5332: Quantified Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5332 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major, or second major in PSYC/COGS/NESC; GSAS or data science graduate.
Description of course contents: This class will provide the foundation necessary to start thinking mechanistically about how neural function gives rise to cognition. Although the focus will be on problems in psychology and neuroscience, the material will have potential for broad application and will cover topics including computational modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Instructor:  Sederberg

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Summer 2022


Psychology

PSYC 2005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I (Session 3)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Smyth

PSYC 2500:  Psychology of Misinformation (Session 2)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Golino

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II (Session 2)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Joseph Meyer & Karen Schmidt

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Session 3)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Instructor: Filip T. Loncke

PSYC 4500 Myths And Controversies  (Session 3)

Credits:  3

Instructor: Elizabeth Gross

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Neuroscience

PSYC 2200 :  Neural Basis of Behavior (Session 2)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Erin Clabough

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Lab (Session 1)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Erin Clabough

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Linguistics

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Session 3)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Instructor: Filip T. Loncke

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Philosophy

PHIL 1510-1 How To Think About Weird Things (Session 1)
Credits:  3

This is mainly an epistemology class, with a little philosophy of science, applied to weird phenomena like ghosts, UFOs, and ESP.  We talk about some main ideas in epistemology, like reasons and evidence, then apply them in depth to beliefs about the paranormal.

Instructor: Kirra Hyde

PHIL 1510-2 Social Media Ethics (Session 1)
Credits:  3

Students will engage with contemporary philosophical theory, data, news & policy to better understand what the social media ecosystem looks like & what role they play. By placing contemporary social media company policies alongside philosophical ethical theories, students will develop a foundational understanding of key ethical concepts and learn reasoning skills that will help them be more intentional about the choices they make online and off.

Instructor: Stephen Marrone

PHIL 1510-3 Free Will and Moral Responsibility  (Session 3).
Credits:  3

What does it mean to have free will? Are we ever morally responsible for our actions? Has science disproved free will? Do all of our actions flow from factors outside of our control? We will consult contemporary philosophical sources as we study these questions and others.

Instructor: Ethan Butt

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Computer Science

CS 1110 Introduction to Programming (Session I)

Credits: 3

Instructor: Raymond Petit

CS 2102 Software Development Methods (Session 3)

Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with grade of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Elizabeth Orrico

CS 2110 Software Development Methods (Session 2)

Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with grade of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Paul McBurney

CS 3102 Theory of Computation (will all count as UL Computer Science Concentration Courses) (Session 2)

Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2110 both with grades of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Nathan Brunelle

CS 3205 HCI in Software Development (will all count as UL Computer Science Concentration Course) (Session I)

Prerequisite: CS 2110

Credits: 3

Instructor: Panagiotis Apostolellis

CS 3710 Intro to Cybersecurity  (will all count as UL Computer Science Concentration Course) (Session I)

Prerequisite: CS 2110

Credits: 3

Instructor: Aaron Bloomfield

(CS 4102, 4640,and 4750 will all count as UL Computer Science Concentration Courses)

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Spring 2022


Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  Morris  & Clark (different sections)

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2005 or 3005 with grade of C or higher. May not be taken concurrently with 2005
Description of course contents: A continuation of discussion of research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours.  Instructor:  Meyer and Schmidt

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions: None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 3490 Infant Development
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 1010
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents Infancy is the time of life during which enormous changes take place- newborns are very different from the inquisitive, walking and talking 2-year-old. The following lines of development during the first two years are traced in detail: motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Environmental influences, including parental behavior are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on caregivers.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Fulfills Second Writing Requirement in CAS)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Third or fourth year Psychology or Cognitive Science major/second major

Description of course contents:  Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.

 Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 

*Note:  PSYC 4155 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology or Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions: Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology; Cognitive Science; or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4280: Neural Basis of Empathy

*Note:  PSYC 4280 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3

Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240

Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major

Description of course contents: This course is designed to provide in-depth experience with the concepts, methods, and techniques used in empathy research. Students will delve into scientific articles on the biological basis of emotional empathy, perspective taking, prosocial behavior, and compassion and learn how these skills can be modulated.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions

*Note:  PSYC 4290 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major

Description of course contents:  Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye witness testimony.  Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

Instructor:  Dodson

PSYC 4500- Section 005 Cognitive Psychology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year PSYC or CogSci majors.

Description of course contents: This course will cover different techniques and methods used in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Through an applied approach, the content studied throughout the semester is integrated with the current research conducted in the cognitive psychology labs.

Instructor: Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4500-Section 006: High-Level Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Restricted to 3rd or 4th year PSYC or CogSci majors.

Description of course contents: This course will cover contemporary data and theory in high level cognitive processes, including reasoning, choice, problem solving, creativity, and collaborative thinking.

Instructor: Willingham

PSYC 4606: Cognitive Biases in Anxiety Disorder

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2410 

Enrollment Restrictions: PSYC 2410 and restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science majors.

Description of course contents: This course examines cognitive processing biases in anxiety and related disorders. To understand, for example, why a person with social anxiety sees only the one scowling face in a room full of smiles, we consider automatic processing of emotional information. The course critiques cutting-edge research on how these processes contribute to anxiety and related problems, and if it is important to change the processes to reduce psychopathology.

Instructor: Teachman

PSYC 5270:  Computational Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5720 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Description of course contents:  Develops skills in processing neural data and analyzing its relationship to stimulus or motor activity. Topics include information theory, receptive fields, point processes, and mixed-effects models. Emphasis is on implementing theoretical concepts with computer programs.

Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 5323 R in Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.

Description of course contents: This course is designed to introduce the statistical language R, with the purpose of preparing students to use and apply quantitative methods in their future psychology research.  Topics may include handling data structures, cleaning data, visualizing and presenting data, and reviewing introductory statistics using R.

Instructor: Meyer

PSYC 5710:  Machine Learning and Data Mining
*Note:  PSYC 5710 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission    
Enrollment Restrictions: 3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major/2nd major; or a Grad A&S student.
Description of course contents:  While most psychological studies ask "is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", ie., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups.
Instructor:  Golino

PSYC 5720: Fundamentals of Item Response Theory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Undergraduates PSYC 2005 or 3005 and 3006       
Enrollment Restrictions:  Instructor Permission only. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course 

Prerequisite:  4th year Psychology major or minor or 4th year in Cognitive Science or Graduate student.

Description of course contents:  This course is designed to introduce you to the concepts of item response theory (IRT) models and their application to substantive psychological problems in measurement, such as test and scale design and analysis.

Instructor:  Schmidt

EDLF 5040:  Education and Neuroscience

*Note:  EDLF 5040  may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will cover theories, methods, and research at the intersection of education and neuroscience and the implications of this work for educational practice. Major topics include research on student development in reading and math, as well as the development of foundational skills that support student learning, including executive functions, emotion regulation, and motivation.

Instructor:  Grammer

EDLF 5260:  Cognitive Psychology and Education
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  This course will include both cognitive psychology and education perspectives, focusing on what cognitive psychology can tell us about how people learn and how to apply that knowledge in education. We will focus on the ways that cognitive psychology research can be designed and evaluated to be most informative in addressing practical questions of education and learning, including research questions, populations, methods, etc.

Instructor:  Jirout

EDLF 5270 Adult Development and Aging

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment restrictions: None

This course will focus on key issues in adult psychological and physical development. We will explore development from a biopsychosocial perspective, examining topics such as health, cognitive function, personality, interpersonal relationships, and work. This will be a theory-to-practice class, with an emphasis on current theories of optimal or successful aging. In particular, we will focus on how adults respond and adapt to changes in their health, their environment, and their sense of self. Contexts for development will include education, health care, the family, and the community, with attention to individual differences (gender, race, ethnicity). 

Instructor: Whaley

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Neuroscience

BME 3636 Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
*Note:  BME 3636 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Cross-listed as NESC 5330.  CS 1110; and BIOM 2101; or permission of the instructor.
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment Restrictions:  Not allowed if BIOL 3050 has been taken or are currently enrolled

Description of course contents:  After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.

Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 3200-001:  Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and BIOL 2100. Enrollment not allowed if already completed or enrolled in BIOL 3050

Enrollment Restrictions: Instructor Consent Required. (If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.)

Description of course contents: This course will build on students' general knowledge of Neuroscience topics and aim to achieve a deeper understanding of the fundamental principles of Neuroscience. Topics covered: (1) cell biological and electrical properties of the neuron; (2) synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity; (3) transduction of physical stimuli and processing of sensory information; and (4) development and evolution and the nervous system.

Instructor: Erisir and Cang

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 

*Note:  PSYC 4155 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology or Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions: Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology; Cognitive Science; or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior

Credits:  4

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 3050

Enrollment Restrictions: Student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents: Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. PSYC 3210 is recommended.

Instructor:  Ribic

PSYC 4280: Neural Basis of Empathy

*Note:  PSYC 4280 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3

Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240

Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major

Description of course contents: This course is designed to provide in-depth experience with the concepts, methods, and techniques used in empathy research. Students will delve into scientific articles on the biological basis of emotional empathy, perspective taking, prosocial behavior, and compassion and learn how these skills can be modulated.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions

*Note:  PSYC 4290 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major

Description of course contents:  Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye witness testimony.  Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.

Instructor:  Dodson

PSYC 5270:  Computational Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5720 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Description of course contents:  Develops skills in processing neural data and analyzing its relationship to stimulus or motor activity. Topics include information theory, receptive fields, point processes, and mixed-effects models. Emphasis is on implementing theoretical concepts with computer programs.

Instructor:  Meliza

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2100 (2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (2020)
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor: Kawasaki

BIOL 4011: Homeostasis Wisdom of the Body
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 and cannot enroll if taken BIOL 4559 # 22
Description of course contents:  The human body maintains stable energy levels, hydration, and temperature despite the challenges of ever-changing external environment, a process known as homeostasis. This course explores biological models and mechanisms of homeostasis, including how survival needs are monitored and met through changes in behavior and physiology. Students will gain a state-of-the-art perspective on homeostatic biology and its research methods and technology.
Instructor: Campbell

BIOL 4013: Stem Cells in Development and Disease
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3010
Description of course contents: The course will deep dive into what stem cells are, what they do, where and how they function, and how we can use stem cells in the clinic to repair damaged tissue and restore tissue function. The course will consist of a series of lectures and student run discussions related to current scientific literature.
Instructor: Siegrist

BIOL 4190: Biological Clocks
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3010 or 3020
Description of course contents:  Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020
Instructor: Provencio

BIOL 4320: Signal Transduction: How Cells Talk To Each Other
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 or BIOL 3010
Description of course contents:  This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010
Instructor: Deppman

BIOL 4330: Wiring the Brain
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3050 (previously BIOL 3170) or PSYC 4200
Description of course contents: This course will cover the current state of knowledge for how neurons form connections in the brain. The course will initially focus on how relatively simple model systems have provided the critical clues as to how specific synaptic connections form. This will be followed by a discussion of how this knowledge can be applied to the understanding and treatment of human neural disorders. About a quarter of the course will be standard lectures and the remainder student-led discussion of primary literature. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010; BIOL 3170 or Psych 2200.
Instructor: Condron

BIOL 4340: Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010; BIOL 3170 or PSYC 2200
Description of course contents: The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor: Mellon

EDLF 5040:  Education and Neuroscience

*Note:  EDLF 5040  may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will cover theories, methods, and research at the intersection of education and neuroscience and the implications of this work for educational practice. Major topics include research on student development in reading and math, as well as the development of foundational skills that support student learning, including executive functions, emotion regulation, and motivation.

Instructor:  Grammer

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Linguistics

ANTH 2410:  Sociolinguistics

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents:  Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.

Instructor:  Lefkowitz

ANTH 2415: Language in Human Evolution

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: Examines the evolution of our capacity for language along with the development of human ways of cooperating in engaged social interaction. Course integrates cognitive, cultural, social, and biological aspects of language in comparative perspective. How is the familiar shape of language today the result of evolutionary and developmental processes involving the form, function, meaning and use of signs and symbols in social ecologies?

Instructor: Sicoli

ANTH 2541: Language Death and Revitalization

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents:  The United Nations declared 2019 the Year of Indigenous Languages in order to raise awareness of the rapid rate at which the world's linguistic diversity is being depleted. This course examines the causes, effects, and ideologies surrounding language endangerment. It also explores the creative processes by which some communities and individuals are resisting the forces of linguistic homogenization and erasure.

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 3559: New Course: Anthropological Linguistics

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents:  The study of human language has often been conducted in isolation from other sciences, especially social ones. This course introduces students to an anthropological approach to linguistics that takes into account the various ways in which sociocultural factors can influence the production, use, and conceptualization of language. We will trace the development of this trend in scholarship from its beginnings to the present day.

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 3450:  Native American Languages
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  LNGS 3250 or another Linguistics course/permission
Description of course contents:  Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.
Instructor: Mirzayan

ANTH 3541: Language and Music

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: This course covers material from sound studies, linguistics, and anthropology. We will address traits that language and music each use in distinctive ways (rhythm, tone, meaning, structure, and embodiment), as well as work through case studies of overlap between language and music (genres of songs, talking drums, whistled speech, and musical replacement of speech), to illuminate the relationship between the two categories.

Instructor: Hoequist

LING 3559 New Course: Tunica Language Typology and Revitalization

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Prior course in linguistic analysis

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the structures of Tunica, a language isolate, and examines them in both historical and contemporary contexts. The Tunica, an Indigenous group of the Lower Mississippi Valley, have been in regular contact with European and American colonizers since the early 18th century. Students will study the diachrony of this Indigenous group as well as the unique features of their reawakening ancestral language.

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 5401: Linguistic Field Methods
Credits:  3

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in linguistic analysis/instructor permission

Description of course contents: The goal of this course is to get hands-on practice doing linguistic analysis based entirely on data collected from a native speaker of a language. [NOTE: “entirely” means that you should not look up already-published grammars and dictionaries or search the web for descriptions of the language we are working on. For the purposes of this course, we will act as if no grammar or dictionary yet exists.]  We will work collaboratively on the same language for the whole semester.  Data collection will begin with phonetic transcription of individual words, with the goal of learning to hear the phonetic detail of an unfamiliar language, and the first assignment will be an analysis of the phonemes of the language, including rules for allophonic variation where relevant. After working out the phonemic system, we will move to analysis of grammar (word structure and phrase/sentence structure), starting with phrases and sentences and going on to a short text.

Instructor: Mirzayan

ANTH 5410: Phonology

Credits:  3

Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor

Description of course contents: Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems.

Instructor: Mirzayan

ANTH 5440:  Morphology 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One Linguistics course (preferred) or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation) and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar.
Instructor:  Dobrin

ANTH 5475: Multimodal Interaction

Credits 3

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in linguistic analysis/instructor permission

Description of course contents: Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.

Instructor: Sicoli

CLAS 3300: Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None
Description of course contents: Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single "proto-language," called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source?

Instructor: George

EDHS 4030: Speech and Hearing Science

Credits:  3

Prerequisite: None
Description of course contents: The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work. 

Instructor: Loncke

FREN 3030: Phonetics

Credits: 3

Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent)

Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard FREN French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

Instructor: Saunders

PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Fulfills Second Writing Requirement in CAS)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science major/minor

Description of course contents:  Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.

 Instructor:  Loncke

RUSS 5032:  Advanced Russian Grammar:  Syntax
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  RUSS 2010 and 2020 and Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course is a formal and systematic analysis of the basic syntactic structures of the contemporary Russian literary language with frequent comparison to English (and other, when possible) structures.  The emphasis will be on data, not theoretical principles although the conventional theoretical machinery and language of syntax (phrase structure, complement, anaphora) will be used at all times in class and on assignments.
Instructor:  Elson

SPAN 4200: History of the Language

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or department placement. Instructor Consent Required

Instructor: Rini

SPAN 4203:  Structure of Spanish

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  SPAN 3015 and 3200

Description of course contents:  Seminar in Spanish linguistics. This is an

advanced introduction to the study of fundamental aspects of the sound and grammatical systems of the Spanish language. The course will start by analyzing present-day (syllable, word and phrase) structures of the language and it will progress toward a more detailed examination of some of the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor:  Rini

 

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Philosophy

PHIL 2500: Survey on Topic: Slurs
Credits:  3
Description of course contents:

Instructor: Fox

PHIL 2640: Rational Choice and Happiness (Fulfills Second Writing Requirement in CAS)
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: In this class, we will examine philosophical puzzles about our ability to make rational choices that affect or determine our own happiness. How can we rationally decide to undergo a significant experience – such as having a child or moving to a new country – when we have no way of knowing what that experience will be like? How can we rationally choose to make decisions about our future?

Instructor:  Barnes

PHIL 2652: Animal Minds and Animal Ethics
Credits:  3

Description of course contents: Other species seem to represent objects in their environments, think about the thoughts of their conspecifics, and perhaps even use language. Some seem to have long-term memory, emotion, and self-awareness. Do they in fact do all of these things, and if so, how, and in what sense? We will engage philosophically with the best scientific evidence available to answer these and similar questions before considering their ethical implications.

Instructor:  Ott

PHIL 3010: Darwin and Philosophy

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents This course explores the history and the philosophical implications of Darwin’s revolutionary idea—that the unguided process of natural selection could explain the magnificent variety and adaptedness of living things and their descent from a common ancestor. We will look at Darwin’s historical, scientific and cultural context, and the evidence and arguments by which Darwin supported his theory. Philosophical topics will include: How are scientific theories supported by evidence? What makes evolutionary theory an accepted scientific theory? What are its moral implications? What does it tell us about human nature, how we should treat one another, and how we should relate to the environment upon which we depend?

same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Eaker

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Ott

PHIL 3400: Introduction to Non-Classical Logic
Credits:  3
Description of course contents: An introduction to systems of non-classical logic, including both extensions and revisions to classical logic.  We will look at logical systems that extend classical logic to deal with the phenomena of possibility and time.  We will look at logics that revise classical logic to allow for sentences which are neither true nor false, or sentences which can be both.  We will show how these departures from classical logic can shed light on various philosophical questions.

Instructor:  Cameron

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Computer Science

Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. 

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 11XX series:  Introduction to Programming   (Credits:  3)

CS 2110: Software Development Methods (Credits:  3)

CS 2120 (was 2102 till Fall 2021):  Discrete Mathematics and Theory I (Credits:  3)

CS 2150: Program and Data Representation (Credits:  3)

BME 3636 Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
*Note:  BME 3636 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Cross-listed as NESC 5330.  CS 1110; and BIOM 2101; or permission of the instructor.
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy

PSYC 5270:  Computational Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5720 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Description of course contents:  Develops skills in processing neural data and analyzing its relationship to stimulus or motor activity. Topics include information theory, receptive fields, point processes, and mixed-effects models. Emphasis is on implementing theoretical concepts with computer programs.

Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 5710:  Machine Learning and Data Mining
*Note:  PSYC 5710 may be used to fulfill either the area or upper level requirement for Cognitive Psychology, Computer Science, or Neuroscience area requirement, but not more than one.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission    
Enrollment Restrictions: 3rd or 4th year Psychology or Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major/2nd major; or a Grad A&S student.
Description of course contents:  While most psychological studies ask "is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", ie., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups.
Instructor:  Golino

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Elective Credit Only

KINE 3660: Neuroscience of Exercise

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course will address the underlying neuroanatomy associated with cognitive function in healthy individuals as well as those with neurocognitive/psychiatric pathologies and diseases. Throughout the semester, students will become consumers of cross- disciplinary research addressing the influence of physical activity and cognitive function.

Instructor: Resch

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for January 2022


Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 4260 Genetic and Epigenetic Research in Behavior 

*Note:  PSYC 4360 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  We will discuss basic concepts in genetics/epigenetics and the role these molecular modifications play in behavior and disorder. We will evaluate empirical papers and learn the molecular techniques described within them. We will interrogate the genome databases and learn about how to identify and isolate differences in human DNA sequence. Completion of this course should result in increased knowledge of the use of genome level data in psychology and biology.

Instructor:: Connelly

PSYC 4559 Exploring the Human Brain

*Note:  PSYC 4559 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits 3

Description of Course: 

Instructor:: Morris

PSYC 5326 The Neuroscience of Social Relationships

*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2005/3005
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 recommended.

Instructor:: Coan

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Neuroscience

PSYC 3210 Research Methods: Psychbiology Laboratory

Credits  3

Pre-requisites: PSYC 2200

Description of Course: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, histology, behavioral analysis, and genetic/epigenetic analyses. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings.

Instructor: Clabough

PSYC 4260 Genetic and Epigenetic Research in Behavior

*Note:  PSYC 4360 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  We will discuss basic concepts in genetics/epigenetics and the role these molecular modifications play in behavior and disorder. We will evaluate empirical papers and learn the molecular techniques described within them. We will interrogate the genome databases and learn about how to identify and isolate differences in human DNA sequence. Completion of this course should result in increased knowledge of the use of genome level data in psychology and biology.

Instructor:: Connelly

PSYC 4559 Exploring the Human Brain

*Note:  PSYC 4559 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits 3

Description of Course: 

Instructor:: Morris

PSYC 5326 The Neuroscience of Social Relationships

*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2005/3005
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 recommended.

Instructor:: Coan

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Fall 2021


Cognitive Psychology

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  Morris (Section 100) Staff (Section 200)

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor: Willingham

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2005 or 3005 with a grade of C or higher

Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (2005 and 3006).
Instructor: Meyer (Section 100) and Schmidt Section 200)

PSYC 3100: Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior 
*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: The course will examine historical and current theories of learning that provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. Students will be exposed to a diverse range of experimental findings that led to principles and concepts that currently explain how environmental, social and emotional factors influence the brain and body to shape human and animal behavior.
Instructor: Williams

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience (Note: New Number)
*Note:  PSYC 3160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200  is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4215 Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4310: Cognitive Aging
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI 
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 4607: Uniquely Human Social Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. In this course we will examine the evolutionary, developmental, and brain foundations that underpin our ultrasocial nature.
Instructor: Grossman

PSYC 5326 The Neuroscience of Social Relationships

*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2005/3005
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 recommended.

Instructor:: Coan

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

PSYC 5705: Introduction to Bayesian Methods
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions: 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: This course will provide a practical introduction to classic and modern Bayesian methods, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences. Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.

Instructor: Tong

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Neuroscience

NESC 4245 Neuroscience Through Nobels
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions: Cannot enroll if previously taken BIOL/PSYC/NESC 3559 topic: Neuroscience Through the Nobels
Description of course contents: Will study Nobel prize winning discoveries that shaped our understanding of the nervous system; explore the original experimental basis for these discoveries; and learn about the Nobel laureates. This course will enable students to acquire a deeper understanding of fundamental principles in Neuroscience, to familiarize with various research techniques, and to develop a sense of history of Neuroscience research.
Instructor: Cang

NESC 4265: Developmental Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: The diverse functions of the nervous system depend on precise wiring of connections between neurons. This course covers cellular and molecular processes of how neuronal connections are established during development. Diseases which result from failing to establish the circuitry will also be discussed. This course will introduce research methods and technology, and encourage students to develop logical rationale of contemporary research.

Instructor: Liu

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 3160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 2200-1: Survey of Neural Basis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience Please note ew Number
*Note:  PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200 or BIOL 3050; PSYC 3005 recommended

Enrollment Restrictions: Must have completed PSYC 2200, 4200, or BIOL 3050.  If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.

Description of course contents: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings.

Instructor: Clabough/Morris

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3260:  Hidden Figures: Brain Science through Diversity

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course will introduce students to basic concepts in neurobiology/neuroscience/brain science discoveries while emphasizing research by women and URMs in science.

Instructor: Ribic

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior

* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 2210

Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents: Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. PSYC 3210 is recommended.

Instructor:  Hill

PSYC 4215 Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 5280:  Neuropsychopharmacology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year PSYC or COGS or Neurosci majors
Description of course contents:  Combines the study of the synaptic circuits function for producing measurable behaviors and the principles of pharmacology. Focus on basic concepts in behavior analysis, pharmacology, and neuropharmacology, and reviews research techniques for assessing the effects of drugs on the behavior of nonhumans and humans.
Instructor:  Erisir

PSYC 5326 The Neuroscience of Social Relationships

*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2005/3005
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year major/2nd major Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience; or graduate A&S student.
Credits 3

Description of Course:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 recommended.

Instructor:: Coan

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: 

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology

* Note:  BIOL 3050 OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  Must have completed BIOL 2100 (formerly BIOL 2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (formerly BIOL 2020) or BIOL 2040

Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040.  May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170. Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.

Instructors:  Condron

BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250

Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.

Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4280:  Genetic Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and 3010 required
Description of course contents:  This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction?   Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills.

Instructor: Hirsh

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  This two-lectures-per-week course explores the basic principles of sensory neurobiology. The course consists of four modules.  Each module represents one of the senses and consists of an introductory lecture, one or several lectures that will delve into the details of that sense, a current topic lecture on some recent finding, and finally, a guest lecture from a UVa researcher.
Instructor:  Provencio

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Linguistics

ANTH 2400: Language and Culture

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

Instructor: Dobrin

ANTH 2430: Languages of the World

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Staff

ANTH 2541: Topics in Linguistics: Technology, Language, & Society

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides a linguistic anthropological perspective on technology and communication. Beginning with the development of the written word and concluding with smart phones and social media, the course will explore the use of various communication technologies in both the United States and around the world in order to better understand the role that language and technology play in politics, power, identity, and community. 

Instructor: Morgenstern

ANTH 2541: Topics in Linguistics: French Creole Language Structures

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents:This course examines the similarities and differences in phonology, morphology, and syntax among those creole languages whose primary lexicon is derived from French. We also consider broader linguistic and anthropological issues concerning creoles. For example, while some have claimed that creoles exist as a typologically distinct class of languages, others have argued that their only commonality is their socio-histories. Familiarity with French, though not required, will be useful. This course fulfills the Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and counts as a Linguistics requirement for Cognitive Science majors.  

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 3541: Topics in Linguistics: Language Change

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: Along the span of history and across the globe, the one constant of human language is change. This course introduces the study and analysis of language change over time in a variety of domains and contexts. Students will learn how to identify and decode processes and results of historical language change and apply these skills to analyze data bearing on relationships and contacts between different languages and their speakers. This course fulfills the Historical requirement for Linguistics majors and counts as a Linguistics requirement for Cognitive Science majors.  

Instructor: Wendte

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology
Instructor:  Sicoli

ANTH 5470:  Language and Identity
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents: In anthropology, where identity has become a central concern, language is seen as an important site for the construction and negotiation of social identities. In linguistics, reference to categories of social identity helps to explain language structure and change. This seminar explores the history of identity within linguistics research, framing the concept through the notion of discourse.  
Instructor:  Wendte

ASL 3450-001: Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse and compares/contrasts them using real-world examples. Describes major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing/contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages.

Instructor:  Jennings-Arey

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

FREN 3030: Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

Instructor: Saunders

LING 3400: Structure of English

(obligatory 1 credit discussion)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures.  Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation.  Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation.  Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Crabtree

LNGS 3250: Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

(optional 1 credit discussion section)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Elson

SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 2020

Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Staff

SPAN 4202: Hispanic Sociolinguistics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and SPAN 3000; or SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and 3200

Description of course contents: This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and bilingualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Velázquez-Mendoza

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Philosophy

PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity. Discussion Required.
Instructor:  Cameron

PHIL2500 (Section 100): Philosophy of Health and Healthcare

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents In this class, we’ll first discuss the question ‘what is health?’ How do we define what it means to be healthy? Is there a difference between physical and mental health? Is there a difference between health and overall well- being? Is health a biological concept or is it something normative? Then we’ll look at specific puzzles that arise in health care related to how we understand health and disease. For example, how do we measure health outcomes? How do we deal with the inherent subjectivity of some aspects of health, such as pain? What is the relationship between what we consider ‘healthy’ and what our culture values or stigmatizes?

Instructor: Barnes

PHIL 2500 (Section 200): Minds, Machines, and Persons
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course surveys foundational issues in the philosophy of cognitive science and mind. Part 1 addresses foundational questions about cognition. Is the mind a brain? A computer? Does the mind extend into the body and environment? What is a mental representation? Part 2 turns to the so-called “Hard Problem” of consciousness: can a physicalist theory of mind explain conscious experience? Part 3 concludes with the problem of personal identify over time. Once you were a kid, now you are an adult, and one day you'll grow old. What (if anything) makes you the same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3010: Darwin and Philosophy

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents This course explores the history and the philosophical implications of Darwin’s revolutionary idea—that the unguided process of natural selection could explain the magnificent variety and adaptedness of living things and their descent from a common ancestor. We will look at Darwin’s historical, scientific and cultural context, and the evidence and arguments by which Darwin supported his theory. Philosophical topics will include: How are scientific theories supported by evidence? What makes evolutionary theory an accepted scientific theory? What are its moral implications? What does it tell us about human nature, how we should treat one another, and how we should relate to the environment upon which we depend?

same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Eaker

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Gertler

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Computer Science

Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. 

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 11XX series:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2110:

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I 

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

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Elective Credit Only

PSYC 4500 Practical Longitudinal Sustainability Studies
Credits:  3 (NOTE: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement)
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: Longitudinal data analytical techniques will be introduced to investigate sustainability issues.

Instructor: Tong

BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development

Credits:  1 (NOTES: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement and is only one credit hour)

Requisites: Instructor Permission

Description of course contents:  This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.

Instructor:  Deppmann