Approved Courses

Cognitive Science Courses

Courses in each of the five core areas are reviewed each term by our area specialists to determine those that align with the content of the study of cognitive science. The approved courses change each term; but some core courses are frequently approved for the COGS course of study areas. These are listed in the frequently approved course page in the menu to the left.

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Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Fall 2021


Cognitive Psychology

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

PSYC 2005-1 & 2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis.
Instructor:  Morris (Section 100) Staff (Section 200)

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor: Willingham

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4 (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2005 or 3005 with a grade of C or higher

Enrollment restrictions:  Must have taken PSYC 2005 or 3005
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (2005 and 3006).
Instructor: Meyer (Section 100) and Schmidt Section 200)

PSYC 3100: Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior 
*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: The course will examine historical and current theories of learning that provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. Students will be exposed to a diverse range of experimental findings that led to principles and concepts that currently explain how environmental, social and emotional factors influence the brain and body to shape human and animal behavior.
Instructor: Williams

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience (Note: New Number)
*Note:  PSYC 3160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200  is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3310: R Applications in Psychology

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Online course This course serves as both an introduction to the R programming language for those who haven't had any previous R background, as well as a refresher and an extension of R topics for those who have taken an intro to R course (i.e., STAT 1601 or PSYC 3006) previously or concurrently.  This course is specially tailored to those who have an interest in psychology, with the purpose of preparing students to use R for their psychological research.
Instructor:  Meyer

PSYC 4155: Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods 
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 4215 Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

 Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4310: Cognitive Aging
Credits:  3

Prerequisites:   None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).

Instructor:  Teles Santos Golino

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI 
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 4607: Uniquely Human Social Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. In this course we will examine the evolutionary, developmental, and brain foundations that underpin our ultrasocial nature.
Instructor: Grossman

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

PSYC 5705: Introduction to Bayesian Methods
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions: 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description of course contents: This course will provide a practical introduction to classic and modern Bayesian methods, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences. Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.

Instructor: Tong

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Neuroscience

NESC 4245 Neuroscience Through Nobels
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions: Cannot enroll if previously taken BIOL/PSYC/NESC 3559 topic: Neuroscience Through the Nobels
Description of course contents: Will study Nobel prize winning discoveries that shaped our understanding of the nervous system; explore the original experimental basis for these discoveries; and learn about the Nobel laureates. This course will enable students to acquire a deeper understanding of fundamental principles in Neuroscience, to familiarize with various research techniques, and to develop a sense of history of Neuroscience research.
Instructor: Cang

NESC 4265: Developmental Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.
Description of course contents: The diverse functions of the nervous system depend on precise wiring of connections between neurons. This course covers cellular and molecular processes of how neuronal connections are established during development. Diseases which result from failing to establish the circuitry will also be discussed. This course will introduce research methods and technology, and encourage students to develop logical rationale of contemporary research.

Instructor: Liu

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 3160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. Psyc 1010 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 2200-1: Survey of Neural Basis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents: After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.

Instructor:  Clabough

PSYC 3160:  Cognitive Neuroscience Please note ew Number
*Note:  PSYC 2160 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Description of course contents: This course is intended as a survey of cognitive neuroscience, with an emphasis on breadth. Each week we will cover one sub-area or topic within cognitive neuroscience including perception, attention, memory, cognitive control and others. Readings will be chapters from the textbooks with few supplemental journal articles. PSYC 2150 and/or PSYC 2200 is recommended but not required.

Instructor:  Long

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200 or BIOL 3050; PSYC 3005 recommended

Enrollment Restrictions: Must have completed PSYC 2200, 4200, or BIOL 3050.  If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.

Description of course contents: Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings.

Instructor: Clabough/Morris

PSYC 3240:  Animal Minds
*Note:  PSYC 3240 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3260:  Hidden Figures: Brain Science through Diversity

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course will introduce students to basic concepts in neurobiology/neuroscience/brain science discoveries while emphasizing research by women and URMs in science.

Instructor: Ribic

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior

* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 2210

Enrollment Restrictions: Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents: Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. PSYC 3210 is recommended.

Instructor:  Hill

PSYC 4215 Computational Methods in Psychology and Neuroscience

*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This class provides a hands-on introduction to applied data science in Psychology and Neuroscience with Python. Students will learn to design and code experiments, collect and process data, and analyze and visualize results, all with freely-available, cross-platform, open-source Python libraries. Advanced topics will include applications of optimization, machine learning, and statistics libraries.

Instructor: Sederberg

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory

*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both. Credits:  3

Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3240 (PSYC 2210)

Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must have taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210 or 3240. Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course and student must be a third or fourth year Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major.

Description of course contents:  The seminar examines historical and current experimental findings to understand how critical brain regions are coordinated to regulate our capacity to learn, remember and store new information. Scientific literature is reviewed to uncover how interactions between separate brain systems encode new experiences associated with emotional learning, spatial memory, decision making, and also represent the source of dysfunctions that lead to memory problems in Alzheimer’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Aging, etc.

Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4420: Brain Mapping with MRI
*Note:  This course- may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 and PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:   Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course; Restricted to 3rd or 4th year Psyc, Cognitive Science, Neurosci major; or a Grad A&S student.

Description of course contents: Human neuroimaging technologies and analytics methods enable exploration of the form, function, and connectivity of the living brain.  Students will gain familiarity with the origins of brain imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), be able to discuss the technical foundations of image reconstruction, view and process raw neuroimaging structural and time-series data, and make inferences about the brain in health and in disease.

Instructor: Van Horn

PSYC 5280:  Neuropsychopharmacology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050
Enrollment Restrictions: Restricted to 3rd or 4th year PSYC or COGS or Neurosci majors
Description of course contents:  Combines the study of the synaptic circuits function for producing measurable behaviors and the principles of pharmacology. Focus on basic concepts in behavior analysis, pharmacology, and neuropharmacology, and reviews research techniques for assessing the effects of drugs on the behavior of nonhumans and humans.
Instructor:  Erisir

PSYC 5326:  The Neuroscience of Social Relationships
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2005
Enrollment Restrictions:  3rd or 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 recommended 
Instructor:  Coan

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: 

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology

* Note:  BIOL 3050 OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  Must have completed BIOL 2100 (formerly BIOL 2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (formerly BIOL 2020) or BIOL 2040

Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040.  May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170. Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.

Instructors:  Condron

BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory

Credits:  3

Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250

Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.

Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4280:  Genetic Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and 3010 required
Description of course contents:  This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction?   Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills.

Instructor: Hirsh

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  This two-lectures-per-week course explores the basic principles of sensory neurobiology. The course consists of four modules.  Each module represents one of the senses and consists of an introductory lecture, one or several lectures that will delve into the details of that sense, a current topic lecture on some recent finding, and finally, a guest lecture from a UVa researcher.
Instructor:  Provencio

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Linguistics

ANTH 2400: Language and Culture

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

Instructor: Dobrin

ANTH 2430: Languages of the World

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Staff

ANTH 2541: Technology, Language, & Society

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides a linguistic anthropological perspective on technology and communication. Beginning with the development of the written word and concluding with smart phones and social media, the course will explore the use of various communication technologies in both the United States and around the world in order to better understand the role that language and technology play in politics, power, identity, and community. 

Instructor: Morgenstern

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology
Instructor:  Sicoli

ASL 3450-001: Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

Credits:  3

Prerequisites: None

Description of course contents: Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse and compares/contrasts them using real-world examples. Describes major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing/contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages.

Instructor:  Jennings-Arey

EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Enrollment restrictions: Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course (except PSYC 4910-4980) per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.

*Note:  EDHS 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description of course contents: This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

Instructor: Loncke

FREN 3030: Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

Instructor: Saunders

LING 3400: Structure of English

(obligatory 1 credit discussion)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures.  Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation.  Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation.  Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Crabtree

LNGS 3250: Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

(optional 1 credit discussion section)

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None

Description of course contents: This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.

Instructor: Elson

SPAN 3000: Spanish Phonetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 2020

Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Staff

SPAN 4202: Hispanic Sociolinguistics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and SPAN 3000; or SPAN 3010 (or equivalent) and 3200

Description of course contents: This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and bilingualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Velázquez-Mendoza

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Philosophy

PHIL 2420: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments from English into a formal system, and to test arguments for validity. Discussion Required.
Instructor:  Cameron

PHIL2500 (Section 100): Philosophy of Health and Healthcare

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents In this class, we’ll first discuss the question ‘what is health?’ How do we define what it means to be healthy? Is there a difference between physical and mental health? Is there a difference between health and overall well- being? Is health a biological concept or is it something normative? Then we’ll look at specific puzzles that arise in health care related to how we understand health and disease. For example, how do we measure health outcomes? How do we deal with the inherent subjectivity of some aspects of health, such as pain? What is the relationship between what we consider ‘healthy’ and what our culture values or stigmatizes?

Instructor: Barnes

PHIL 2500 (Section 200): Minds, Machines, and Persons
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: This course surveys foundational issues in the philosophy of cognitive science and mind. Part 1 addresses foundational questions about cognition. Is the mind a brain? A computer? Does the mind extend into the body and environment? What is a mental representation? Part 2 turns to the so-called “Hard Problem” of consciousness: can a physicalist theory of mind explain conscious experience? Part 3 concludes with the problem of personal identify over time. Once you were a kid, now you are an adult, and one day you'll grow old. What (if anything) makes you the same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Irving

PHIL 3010: Darwin and Philosophy

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents This course explores the history and the philosophical implications of Darwin’s revolutionary idea—that the unguided process of natural selection could explain the magnificent variety and adaptedness of living things and their descent from a common ancestor. We will look at Darwin’s historical, scientific and cultural context, and the evidence and arguments by which Darwin supported his theory. Philosophical topics will include: How are scientific theories supported by evidence? What makes evolutionary theory an accepted scientific theory? What are its moral implications? What does it tell us about human nature, how we should treat one another, and how we should relate to the environment upon which we depend?

same person throughout these stages of your life?
Instructor:  Eaker

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others.  We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical.  Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Metaphysics and Epistemology.)
Instructor:  Gertler

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Computer Science

Most Computer Science courses are acceptable for the COGS major except CS 1010, CS 1020, and CS 1501 Special Topics courses. CS 1501 courses are CR/NC grading which within the College of Arts and Sciences means they cannot be used to fulfill major credit hours. 

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 11XX series:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2110:

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I 

PSYC 5500-001 Introduction to Network Analysis
*Note:  PSYC 5500-001 Intro to Network Analysis may be used to fulfill only one area of the three it is approved for- Cognitive Psychology,  Neuroscience, or Computer Science.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  Student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: This course will cover introductory network analysis methods applied to social and psychometric networks. Focus will be on practical data analysis, with assignments being done in the R programming language.
Instructor: Henry

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Elective Credit Only

PSYC 4500 Practical Longitudinal Sustainability Studies
Credits:  3 (NOTE: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement)
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Enrollment is not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course per semester and student must be a 3rd or 4th Psychology major or Interdisciplinary-Cognitive Science major.
Description of course contents: Longitudinal data analytical techniques will be introduced to investigate sustainability issues.

Instructor: Tong

BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development

Credits:  1 (NOTES: this course will not fulfill COGS area or upper level course requirement and is only one credit hour)

Requisites: Instructor Permission

Description of course contents:  This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.

Instructor:  Deppmann

Cognitive Science Approved Courses for Summer 2021


Cognitive Psychology

Psychology

PSYC 2005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I (Session 3)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Chandra Mason

PSYC 2300:  Introduction to Perception (Session 1)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Elizabeth Blair Gross

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II (Session 1)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Joseph Meyer & Karen Schmidt

PSYC 3100- Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior (Session 1)

*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3

Instructor: Cedric L. Williams

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Session 2 & 3)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Instructor: Filip T. Loncke

PSYC 4500- 002 Psychology of Music (Session 1)

Credits:  3

Instructor: Staff

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Neuroscience

PSYC 2200 :  Neural Basis of Behavior (Session 2 & 3)  ONLINE ASYNCH
Credits:  3

Instructor: Erin Clabough

PSYC 3100- Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior (Session 1 & 2)

*Note:  PSYC 3100 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3

Instructor: Cedric L. Williams

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Lab (Session 1)
Credits:  3

Instructor: Erin Clabough

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Linguistics

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics (Session 2 & 3)
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Instructor: Filip T. Loncke

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Philosophy

PHIL 1510 (Section 6) : Philosophy of Mental Health (Session 1) 
Credits:  3

Instructor:  Oakley

PHIL 1510 (Section 6) : Science Fiction and Philosophy  (Session 3) 
Credits:  3

Instructor:  Cetic

ANTH 2589/PHIL 2500 The Past, Present, and Future of Humankind

Credits:  3

Instructor:  Eaker, Most

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Computer Science (These courses are listed under the School of Engineering)

CS 1110 Introduction to Programming (Session I)

Credits: 3

Instructor: Raymond Petit

CS 2102 Software Development Methods (Session 3)

Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with grade of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Elizabeth Orrico

CS 2110 Software Development Methods (Session 2)

Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with grade of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Paul McBurney

CS 3102 Theory of Computation  (Session I)

Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2110 both with grades of C- or above

Credits: 3

Instructor: Nathan Brunelle

CS 3205 HCI in Software Development  (Session I)

Prerequisite: CS 2110

Credits: 3

Instructor: Panagiotis Apostolellis

CS 3710 Intro to Cybersecurity  (Session I)

Prerequisite: CS 2110

Credits: 3

Instructor: Aaron Bloomfield

(CS 4102, 4640, 4720, and 4750 will all count as UL Computer Science Concentration Courses)